1. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

  2. David Hunt

    David Hunt Charter Member Senior Member Published

    That one sold is in like new condition and with the serial number that high, I'd venture to say it was one of the later units made, which is why it's in such pristine condition.

    It's the tri-pod and windlass that I've been wanting to find. You don't have any of those do you?
     
  3. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Nope!! Just a few clamps. [6] Actually I've never seen either, only in pictures.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  4. David Hunt

    David Hunt Charter Member Senior Member Published

    Same here. But doesn't it bug you to know that they're out there somewhere, probably sold a scrap metal because no one remembers or knows what they're for? It sure bugs me.
     
  5. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Ya , a little bit. It would be nice to display the whole set in one group. But again it is the element of having the room for me. I already have enough old tools to fill a 36 ft wall and working on coming around the corner.
    Now the other thing is that I'm coming up in age there is no one in my family that wants them.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  6. David Hunt

    David Hunt Charter Member Senior Member Published

    Daris, please understand, by no means am I saying 'this is what you should do', but knowing that your not psychic, if I were able to think out loud, here's a thought you might consider and you may have already done something like this...

    Catalogue, number & document the collection in a set of binders to prepare the collection for a museum. Each item on a separate page with a photograph, manufacture name, date, item serial and/or patent number ((I know you've done a lot of patent searches and these could be included as supplemental documents)) and a brief description of the purpose and/or function of the tool. There could also be a 'special notes' section to include where or how the tool was acquired and any provenance that might be attached to a specific item.

    As you know, we do a lot of museum work and what I've always been amazed at is not the items on display but the size of the collections kept in storage. Many items in these collections never see the light of day because they are either pending documentation or completion as part of a larger group, story or display. You have the grouping and understand the relevance of each item and its chronologic importance in the evolution of our trade. Because the real value in your collection is not the individual items, but the story that is told in the collective and we really need to get that story into written words.

    This is not a story about tools. This is a story about a specific chapter in American history that has impacted every person that has ever walked on carpet and that's pretty much everyone. It's not the story of the carpet, it's the story of how the carpet got there and, just like the tri-pod for the Hurdy Gurdy, it's there, but no one knows what it is or the significance of the item collecting rust and dust.

    Again, this is just me thinking out loud and in closing I will add this, if I can be of any assistance, please don't hesitate to call, email or message me. Anytime. Hope this helps.

    With kindest regards,

    David Hunt
     
  7. JPfloor

    JPfloor Pro Member

    A carpet museum. An interesting concept. I like it.:)

    Might draw some interest from the masses in a few more years, when ALL flooring is made out of some plastic click together crap...:cool:
     
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