Vinyl Planks on Stage with Steps

Discussion in 'Spotlight on Flooring Professionalism' started by Incognito, Oct 12, 2016.

  1. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Had about a month off to tend to some personal business/vacation. The shop wanted me to do this VCT/LVP job in an elementary school multi-purpose room.

    The complication was that the steps to the stage were slightly rounded but in an irregular way as concrete SHOULD be expected to be. The nosings they specified were designed for a square step. So I had to do some...........finagling. I probably should have used Bondo/stair nose epoxy but I felt Feather Finish would be adequate in this case.

    The LVP was a Shaw product ( I think, that was the glue) The VCT was a 3-color diagonal checkerboard with a 4'x4' square.

    It took a minute.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Did you glue the nosing on or use double tape on it? Looks great.
     
  3. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Contact cement.

    On the step I brushed it on thick with a piece of carpet tile as a paint brush. That didn't work on the nosing as they were bent and coiled to the point I could not get the little carpet tile brush to work. So I used the standard brush that comes in the little pint cans of contact. All told I used 3/4 of a quart of contact cement. Took all of 4 hours just to glue and install the nosings besides for all the prep which took nearly as long.

    Here's an example where the tape would have been very cost efficient......INDEED.
     
  4. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor Senior Member

    These are the kinds of things that sales people just often don't "get" you can spend mor time messing with the stakrnose than actually installing the flooring
     
  5. Jon Scanlan

    Jon Scanlan That Kiwi Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    You get some good ones don't you?
    You must like having to think how to go about jobs like this :D
     
  6. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    I wasn't very confident in that relatively flimsy nosing. I'd have liked to use a much heavier one. Then again those can be awkward to bend around the radius. In retrospect I should have squared up the steps before putting the flooring and cove base. I didn't really notice precisely how rounded they were. In some spots it was near enough to barely need any extra work. Other part were much more rounded and needed filler. When I finally set the nosing onto the contact cement I felt like it was going to work well. It looks good at leas and I'm very confident of a one year labor guarantee. I'd sure like for it to hold up longer than that though.
     
  7. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    There's a new salesman in the shop and this was his bid. I never actually spoke with him because...........I don't even know his phone number. But I did meet him. Last year they sent him out as a helper to our jobs so he would have a CLUE as to what all that jibberish on the blueprints, specifications and proposal documents were all about. He's a very nice guy. He's the brother of the owner. So..........I'm going to work with him on these sorts of things.

    We look down the road years in advance and try to leave happy customers at the same time learning how to price jobs like this. Always have. It's not about squeezing every penny out of a job. That's how big companies last. That's what I like most about the shop I work for.
     
  8. Completefloors

    Completefloors Pro Member

    mine was easier.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    We did a wood stage in lvp, maybe used the same stairnose. I grinded everything and even somewhat rounded the nosing. After setting plank I realized it should have been left square.

    Anyhow, we were all set to contact the vinyl stairnose, I was even going to lightly sand the plank where the nosing attaches, but, we ended up using a high quality quart size caulk gun with Urethane, I figure the surface of vinyl is urethane so it should be compatible. It should set fine being able to somewhat get air to it.

    It slid in place, I filled the gap between the riser and tread with some urethane, then cleaned up the excess.

    The contact cement would have to be placed accurately, no adjustment. I think contact being thicker gets weaker, its strongest is when all voids are filled and tight against each piece to be bonded.

    So how the urethane stuck I don't know.
     
  10. Completefloors

    Completefloors Pro Member

    i think putting a thick layer of contact on two smooth surfaces is weaker bond with out a doubt. But i also think 1 coat painted on isnt too strong either. anything i use contact cement on that will be kicked a lot of have a lot of traffic, i always paint it on both sides, let it dry, paint again, let dry, then secure it in place
     
  11. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I know it has to be both sides, never thought about two coats, interesting!
     
  12. JPfloor

    JPfloor Pro Member

    Looks great! Nice job!

    I agree the thinner gauge nosing, although not as sturdy, was probably a good choice in this situation due to the radius.


    I agree there too. The nice thing about the nose epoxy is it not only repairs any imperfections in the concrete, and fills all voids, it creates a great bond to the vinyl nosing too! :)
     
  13. Jon Scanlan

    Jon Scanlan That Kiwi Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Years ago we were doing on of those super thick sport floors and couldn't get the ends of the rolls down even with contact glue
    Importer rang French manufacturer and they said put two layers of contact glue on
    Soon as they said that I knew that.
    Just forgotten about that method and it worked
     
  14. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Seems like grays are a hard color to photo. I can't really see what's what on that stage or the steps. Don't you have to comply with the visually impaired contrasting colors?
     
  15. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Visually impaired? How bout like my wife, plain ol clumsy!

    How many people walked off the end of a stage?
     
  16. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    All stairwells here require a contrasting color stripe on the bottom and top steps. They used the black nosing and black base combined to effect that.
     
  17. Completefloors

    Completefloors Pro Member

    This job was one of the "customer will supply material on site" jobs. All i did was install.

    Sent from my SM-J700P using Tapatalk
     
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