Verifying carpet and pad choices - Dreamweaver w/ Memory Step Pad

Discussion in 'Carpet Q&A' started by iron, Mar 25, 2017.

  1. iron

    iron New Member

    background:
    i read about 50 posts on this site, and a few from elsewhere, and vacillated for awhile between nylon vs. smartstrand. ultimately, nylon is our choice for a basement install.

    next, we narrowed it down to dixie or dreamweaver. the dixie definitely seemed like it would be more durable (and had a higher PAR), but the softness of the dreamweaver + a preferred color option + lower price sold us.

    i tested out all the 8lb and 10lb pads in the store. i thought the 7/16" rebond felt like junk. the one i liked most was an 8lb memory step pad. i saw in another post that a pro installer said rebond will look just like it did 10 years later as it did of the day of install, whereas memory foam type pads will break down. the carpet store sales rep (35 years exp) originally was pushing us for the basic 7/16" 8lb rebond. but when i felt it, i wasn't sold. when i concluded the memory step was my choice, he said that's actually we he used in his house.

    so, does anyone have negative feedback on the memory step 8lb pad?

    also, for our stairs, i'm thinking of using 10lb victorious pad. i liked how this felt even more, but it's $.90/SF vs. $.70/SF, so using it in a small, high traffic area like stairs seems to make sense to me. would i regret having a denser foam on the stairs?

    anticipated use: we bought the house 2+ years ago and have remodeled everything --- not a flip; planning to stay awhile. we have a 6 month old baby right now that's a few weeks from crawling and the basement, where the new carpet is going, is going to be the rec room where craziness can take place. we'll probably have a 2nd kiddo at some point in time.

    thanks
     
  2. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I don't know how memory holds up, good question. I tend to go less quality the further away from the front door. Less traffic. The stairs higher quality, basement would be the least expense tolerable. Pad if you don't bottom out, meaning if it resists your foot pressure it's good enough and not really thought about. All this hoopla about cushion is good profit margin. A few years ago when I did a couple of carpet installs I liked 2$ a yard for 6lb rebond from a retailer and that was my price but I know the owner and profit he doesn't shy away from.
     
  3. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In Senior Member

    If you like memory foam, go for it. It should hold up fine in the basement. Also, it's been my experience that foam has less chemical off-gasing than bonded, not sure why, maybe others here could confirm.

    As for the steps, are they willing to sell the amount needed ?
    Probably 6' x 6' or 36 sq' x .90 = 32.40 ......that sounds ok, I guess.
    We would throw that type of request in for free.
    I always preferred denser cushion on stairs, especially when the
    room pad was less than what it could be and we always had scrapes
    laying around in the shop.

    Have you visited a mom + pop retailer yet, I recommend doing so !!

    The baby is crawling !! :eek: O-No, let the games begin.

    Best of luck

    Mike
     
  4. HThomas

    HThomas New Member

    Can you tell me if you installed the Dream Weaver and how it has held up?
     
  5. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    We use felt pad for everything and sometimes an 8lb rebond, they are both the same price. What wears out carpet is movement up and down. The less movement the better.
     
  6. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    That doesn't actually "wear out" carpet, but it does damage the primary and secondary backing bond, which can result in delamination, wrinkles and other problems. That's why a firm pad is so important.

    Friction (abrasion) on the fuzzy side of the carpet is what causes wear. Longer piles can also exhibit friction with up and down movement, but the bigger problem with longer yarns is matting. The problem is exacerbated with lack of proper care. Dirt, especially sand, will grind away at the fibers, making them break down. As installers, we have seen the surprised look on our customers' faces when they see the sand under the carpet when we pull it up. They don't even understand where it came from, because there isn't any real sand in their environments. But we know it is there and it gets tracked in every day.
     
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  7. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I think it’s a balance, say no pad is down, that’s zero flex, so force applied downward will crush easier due to being in between a rock and hard place. So, it should be part of a system to minimize downward pressure and yet allow enough movement to not force fibers down upon itself. I still have carpet down a few years longer than I want, doesn’t look much different, it’s matted in traffic areas (cut pile) and I appreciate the sand filtering through.
     
  8. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    A lot of the "sand" under the carpet is out of the backing that is used for filler in the latex when the latex is breaking down. Really it is ground up marble dust[calcium carbonate].

    :old:

    Daris
     
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  9. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Yeah, my 68-year old brain forgot about that part. I've been retired too long. :(
     
  10. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In Senior Member

    Let me talk about them backins ;)..." Stireeeeene, Benzeeeeene,
    crushed marble duuuuust " by Jimmy Walker, got-a love that accent. :D
     
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  11. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    That Dream weaver name sounds familiar like I've installed it but I don't really pay that much attention to the names of carpets unless I've done a ton of it.
     
  12. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    • Appreciation Appreciation x 1
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