Transitions & Alignment Around Obstacles

Discussion in 'Hardwood and Laminates Q&A' started by LukeR, Jan 1, 2018.

  1. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    I'm preparing to install 3/4" x 3 1/2" oak over 3/4" plywood in a center-hall colonial. I'll be pulling up sheet vinyl and carpet (House & flooring circa 2001...looong over due). I plan to start at the entryway, running the flooring parallel to the front of the house (because that's what the boss wants). Question: at the sliding glass door, the flooring looks like it will be 1/4" to 3/8" below the top of the metal channel for the door (see photo). What are my best options for making this transition? I'm assuming I need to maintain 3/8" gap between the flooring and the channel.
     

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  2. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    I'm preparing to install 3/4" x 3 1/2" oak over 3/4" plywood in a center-hall colonial for the entire first floor (except the bathroom). I'll be pulling up sheet vinyl and carpet (House & flooring circa 2001...looong over due). I plan to start at the entryway ("A" in the attached diagram), running the flooring parallel to the front of the house, working front to back. Question: As I get to end of the walls between the living room and Front hall ("B"), and the playroom and the stairs ("C"), how can I get the courses to line up? For reference, the distance between "A" and "B" is about 15 ft. floorplan2.jpeg
     
  3. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Normally it’s a Baby Threshold. The leg is 3/4” thick on bottom then the flooring would be 1-1/4” away from aluminum. A picture of the end of slider will help.
     
  4. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Your front chalkline is then measured off of and struck toward the back part of that hallway, parallel to the front line. So as you go thru hallway you can measure from that back chalkine to where the hardwood is installed. Then you would strike another line when you figure a full row of hardwood you can fasten. Continuously measure to ensure it stays straight. It’s easy to veer off, don’t take it for granted.
     
  5. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    Many thanks. Two pics attached: top down, and door open looking at where the channel meets the door frame AC385D66-2DCF-4FE0-9810-562298C71CAC.jpeg BB02029C-49A8-4D2B-850D-8C4F8EE03B1F.jpeg
     
  6. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    Thanks again, Mike. So if I'm understanding you correctly: My first chalk line is struck parallel to the front of the house through the play room, entryway & living room to start the work. From that line I measure off another parallel line through the back hall/kitchen dinning area that would allow for a full course. Then continuously measure to that line as a I work to keep the courses straight/parallel?
     
  7. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Threshold- it’s best to have it onsite so you know exactly what expansion you’ll need, if it’s available etc. But you would undercut the trim and side piece(I forget terminology) for the hardwood to go under frame and the (it’s also called carpet reducer) baby threshold buts to aluminum sill.
     
  8. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Chalk lines. There’s going to be two lines through hallway. One furthest back, usually on a full foot mark, maybe 8-12” before the left side wall as looking into hall. Then as you install you can continuously check to make sure your hardwood is running straight and will connect back up. So basically you covered your start line so you transferred it furthest away to still use a straight line that will not be covered until you don’t need it any longer.

    As you start to install in hallway the hardwood piece starting to go into Hall you can measure how far away it is on that reference line, then measure same distance at the end of hall and strike that line, this way you will stay straight with that reference line.
     
  9. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I would use 1/2" oak quarter round glued to that or pinned to the wood to cover your spacing. It might need to be abit smaller than that but could be cut on a tablesaw.
     
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  10. Dan Schultz

    Dan Schultz Certified Wood Floor Inspector Charter Member

    What is the direction of the floor joists?
     
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  11. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    True, I was a bit concerned that all other guidelines such as those of NWFA standards should be followed.
     
  12. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    The floor joists run front to back of the house. The flooring will lay perpendicular to the joists
     
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  13. Dan Schultz

    Dan Schultz Certified Wood Floor Inspector Charter Member

    The boss is right in layout direction.:)
     
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  14. LukeR

    LukeR Member

    So, my concern was that I needed to leave an expansion gap between the metal channel and the wood materials as I will do around the rest of the perimeter of the floor. Can I butt the (oak) transition up to the metal channel with out a gap or do I need the gap & hide with the 1/4 round ?
     
  15. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Yes, butt the transition to the slider channel. The hardwood should fall under the lip of the transition, leaving a gap between the hardwood and the inside base of the transition. Undercut the door casings and trims so that the hardwood slips under them and still has room to move.
     
  16. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I have butted several here with no problems, as long as you have expansion everywhere else. That or hold it about an 1/8" away and caulk it but caulk doesn't last forever.
     
  17. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Glad I waited to reply. I assumed Luke wanted to but hardwood to sill like many want.

    Transition piece is one 2” wide isolated. The hardwood is a field of many pieces together with force when expanding could exceed 1000 psi or more, just a starting point.
     
  18. Tom Potter

    Tom Potter Pro Member

    Looks like your slider may be leaking a little bit. Don't want that effecting your new hardwood.

    I'm personally not a fan of the baby threshold butted up to something vertical. They leave that little gully that likes to collect crap. If that's what was ordered for me i usually run it down my table saw and cut that bevel off. They make a piece thats specifically for this but cant think of the name. Its basically a baby threshold without the bevel. If it was my house i would do a piece of Q round or shoe cut to sit flush with top of slider channel.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  19. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Clam Reducer also works but doesn’t extend to substrate for fastening purposes. It can be reduced in width by a tablesaw, soften cut edge with sand block and stain cut. I would caulk the small joint between the two materials to seal.
     
  20. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    I cut off more than just the bevel on baby thresholds. I rip it down to just the overlapping part. Kind of like making a piece of screen molding but the color matches the product. Same thing with T- molds if that’s what was ordered. Couple passes through the table saw with a sharp blade and you can modify just about any threshold. Be smart and think it through before you just go ripping.

    As of lately I do a lot of 1/4 round at exterior doorways. Thats just how it is here. Having said that, 1/4 round looks clunky at doorways. It’s easy but clunky. Around here I see 1/4 round against tubs all the time. Even vinyl:mad: Drives me nuts. Now I’m forced to use 1/4 round at the tub to cover up the last guys shenanigans. I suppose I should just be glad I’m not cove basing the darn thing.
     
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