Thinset for tack strip?

Discussion in 'Carpet Sales and Installations' started by Barry Carlton, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. Barry Carlton

    Barry Carlton Senior Member Published

    I have a small job that has very old brittle concrete. I installed carpet about 12-13 years ago and the concrete was miserably hard. Since then someone pulled the berber out and install glue down. Now, different owner, wants stretch back in there. The glue down is pulled and there are expected craters where the strip was pulled out. I would like to fill the craters and adhere the strip in one step/trip. Would thinset work for this? It's one room and about 32 yards. Not enough in it to warrant any more than 2 trips to install.
     
  2. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I would clean where the strip goes real good and use contact adhesive for the bite. Thinset could work but takes longer to cure out. I have some expensive stuff that dries to grind in 10 minutes but drier mix of patch with latex milk would work faster. Can you use tritack and cover the craters? Then I wouldn't bother patching. Just clean good and use some of the strip grip glue you can get. Like this epoxy.Duo-Fast Jet-Tac Tack Strip Epoxy, 10 oz. Cartridge
     
  3. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    There's no way thinset formulated for ceramic/porc. tile would bond well enough to tackstrip. I would just use quick setting patch to fill and then hammer drill 3/4-1" fluted hardened nails.

    The deep gouge would not allow say a urethane tube adhesive to cure fast enough and the adhesive would have to be grinded off for the tackstrip to bond to slab, guess I would charge additional to patch and hammer drill/secure tackstrip.
     
  4. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor Senior Member

    Sds hammer drill and dowel. Would take about an hour and half and thn you're set with no surprises and tackstrip that is holding better than any glue or concrete nail
     
  5. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I tried to be ignorant but after more than once you said dowel. My way would bust out another big chunk if removed in future. Your way would not, just a circle if removed. I don't think you've explained that Kyle, but that's a brilliant way to prevent damage if someone didn't want chunks to be taken out of concrete/terrazzo/ if in future tackstrip would be removed.
     
  6. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor Senior Member

    1/4" wood dowel then pound a roofing nail down an it's done. Best wat to attach metals too, even works for flat metal, just mark the holes
     
  7. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I've used joist hanger nails before into large cracks as they are fatter than roofers. Depends on the damage left. I've seen them that can't even be drilled. Alumidrives are good if they work, every floor is different.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  8. Darren Ramey

    Darren Ramey Charter Member I Support TFP

    I'd use commercial strip and a fast drying epoxy. DuoFast Jet-Tack would work great. Dab it on the floor in between the voids and the wide strip should cover everything.
     
  9. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Can't dab it on the existing cheap latex carpet adhesive, will separate, but I do agree about the epoxy, yet the cost. Also a nail holds the strip all the way through the plies. The epoxy only holds the bottom of the tackstrip, so shear strength is more significant if fasteners placed every 10? "

    These are pins left in place at my bank outside, probably because when it got wet it stayed wet long after rain and flooding is gone. So that's kind of tacky the remnants of tackstrip/fastening carpet transitions.
     

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  10. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    If you want something that will hold very quickly and also fill the spaulds use Bondo. Pricey though.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  11. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor Senior Member

    I'm tellin ya, you're into it for less money and time with the dowel method. I bought a box of dowels for $40 three years ago and I'm not through half of them yet.
     
  12. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    What's the method? You don't drill 1/4" through tackstrip, so you use 1/8" drill through tackstrip, it leaves mark, then move tack out of way and drill 1/4". I was thinking you used the 3 ft dowels, insert and snap off.
     
  13. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor Senior Member

    Take tack strip cutters and cut dowel down to 1 1/4" pieces approximately. Use 1/4" sds bit and drill right through tackstrip, insert dowel and pound in large head roofing nail. Holds tight
     
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  14. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In I Support TFP Senior Member

    Barry ! mix up some killer strong cake batter and set the tackless in that ;)

    Kyle, I'm tired of hearing about the ' dowel method ' so much, that
    I'm taking it as a sign to give it a try :) ...........Thanks Man !
    Some people, like me, can be very stubborn.

    Mike ! thanks for getting Kyle to give instructions. I was over-thinking
    it for sure.
     
  15. Don Monfils

    Don Monfils PRO CARPET Charter Member

    I take a big bundle of dowel rod and tightly wrap it in shrink wrap.
    Then I set up a jig on my chop saw at the desired length . And chop,chop chop.
    Then push the small rods out of the wrap.
    With this method you can make hundreds of pieces, all the same length at the same time
     
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  16. Hanover Fist

    Hanover Fist Pro Member

    What's wrong with hammer drilling holes for Crain aluminum spreader nails? Takes no time at all and costs pennies...
     
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  17. Don Monfils

    Don Monfils PRO CARPET Charter Member

    AC6FECCA-A368-42DC-A92B-B67FA2D56783.jpeg 9D3D2433-5AA4-4FA1-B014-5D49AEE9CEC3.jpeg Found a couple of pics, just incase my ramblings didn’t make sense
     
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  18. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I knew what you were saying Don. I wanted to cut my Asparagus like that.

    Those Crain aluminum didn't cooperate with me very well,(bent some of them) the square bits etc. but that was like 20 years ago, still have 1/4 of the original container. Not sure what I was doing wrong.
     
  19. Don Monfils

    Don Monfils PRO CARPET Charter Member

    The 7/8” drives usually work great on tackstrip.
    For clamp down metal you need shorter ones ( I think they are 5/8”). The longer ones will bottom out too soon and bend the drive. Also when drilling for transitions ,I vacuum the dust out of the holes
     
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  20. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I agree about clearing out the drill holes, same with tapcon screws, I may have used a 1/8" carbide bit and the Crain bit may be a tad wider.
     
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