Skim coating prior to linoleum

Discussion in 'Floor Preparation' started by Lo Down, Nov 18, 2006.

  1. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    I will be installing some Armstrong linoleum on a new plywood floor......... at first I thought it was going to be Forbo, and reading the installation Forbo's instructions, it said that skim coating a floor can often cause more problems than it solves.................. why do they say that?

    I usually roll on a coat of additive to a plywood floor, then do the skim coat with Webcrete mixed with it's additive............. once in a while I have even rolled a coat of additive onto the skim coat after it has dried. I have sometimes rolled a coat of additive onto bare plywood.............. It makes the glue spread a whole lot better and gives more open time if you want it....... the glue grabs like a magnet.
    These methods seem to work excellent with vinyl floors.......... is there something drasticly different with linoleum and their adhesives?
     
  2. Floorguy

    Floorguy The Living Dead Charter Member Senior Member

    Priming the floor is good practice.
     
  3. hookknife

    hookknife Hard Surface Installer Charter Member Senior Member

    Its hard to beat the bond between lino and straight plywood, thier prollly thinking of the skim coat as the weakest link, a lot of people mix thier patches too wet which in turn means weak patch and as said a weak link in the floor covering process, sometimes it is easier to say no skim coat to CYA as a manufacturer:D
     
  4. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    That's kinda what I figured. I know a lot of guys just sweep and don't vacuum the floors before patching or gluing.
     
  5. Zero Punch

    Zero Punch Charter Member

    "lot of people mix thier patches too wet which in turn means weak patch "
    I see that way too often. I never patch what doesn't need it but each install is different and I judge the amount of prep by how each material handles slight surface imperfections and they do show differently depending on composition and gauge.
     
  6. hookknife

    hookknife Hard Surface Installer Charter Member Senior Member

    Lo Down, Just for the record I prime my floors also, even if im not gunna skim it I will usually prime it, I think it is a good thing too, just like Perry said "good practice".
     
  7. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    Would you skim a substrate, if you were laying a homogeneous vinyl over it, and using a 2 part adhesive?;)
     
  8. hookknife

    hookknife Hard Surface Installer Charter Member Senior Member

    Homogeneous vinyl= lots of floor prep,unless you want a visual of the substrate underneath it,hehehhe
     
  9. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    Probably...................... You think a guy mitres his tackstrip with a chop saw and stains it to match the wood baseboard, then gives it two days to dry before putting on the 3 coats of satin Varathane (sanding between coats), would not over do floor prep on a floor that used epoxy..................... 'cmon... you know me better than to ask a silly question like that. :D :D :D

    Lots of hammer dings in this new plywood, and I am going to add some more because the guy that installed it was a little frugal. I figure skim coating would be easier than filling each nail head................ Think the job is around 56 yards.
     
  10. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    What do you use to prime? I just roll on a coat ot acrylic mortar admix or the liquid additive made for Webcrete... D-L 16...... same stuff but I like the D-L16 better.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2006
  11. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    I was thinking more along the lines of the epoxy, which I have never used, being compatible with our normal latex based products. Guess it was a dumb question?
     
  12. hookknife

    hookknife Hard Surface Installer Charter Member Senior Member

    This might be a dumb question, but why are you going to use a 2-part ???? was it spec'd for the job or something???? there are only a few instances where a 2-part would be needed????
     
  13. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    Sorry, I thought you were just being a funny. I would check with the manufacturers instructions. I did a lot of prep in some new construction and HAD to float it out.... As I was thumbing through the instructions that night, I notice that it said: "Do not use cement type fillers"
    ..... O CRAP, now what dod I do?
    Remove it and start again?
    So I decided to do some bonding tests with the adhesive that night and sure enough, it did not bond hardly at all to Webcrete 98 mixed with water, or Webcrete 98 mixed with latex. I then put on a sealer coat of acrylic mortar admix over a test patch of W98 mixed with latex and let it dry for an hour in front of the heater........................ Saved my ass. It stuck great.
    It was an Armstrong product I think, and required a glue I had never used before........ one that required a specific amount of open time............ It wasn't epoxy, but I would certainly check with the manufacturer on compatability with the floor patch type.
     
  14. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    You're right Hook. Epoxy may not of been what I need. Did not go look at the job; it was put off until Mid December.
     
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