Shaw Prefinished Engineered Wood Floor

Discussion in 'Spotlight on Flooring Professionalism' started by Chris 45, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Existing flooring is a combination of 3/4" sand n finish and 1/2" particle board. Homeowner opted for 1/4" plywood underlayment to be installed on top of the particle board to flush out the 2 differing substrate heights. The other option would be to demo the hardwood and install 1/2" underlayment. Either option would work in this situation so it comes down to money. I'm OK with that because I really didn't want to demo a bunch of nail down 3/4" right after returning home from vacation:eek:

    Rip n haul was done by the carpet installer. Had to scrape staples, pull base boards and tack strip then install 22 sheets of 1/4" to flush out with the existing hardwood. No T-molds anywhere and we're wrapping around a few things. It can be done fairly easily but you gotta pay a little more attention to maintaining an adequate expansion gap everywhere since there are some 50+ foot runs.

    We snapped a control line down the longest central point and fastened some scab boards down. It's a Shaw pre-finished engineered wood floating floor so I didn't have to get too crazy with the scab boards. We may or may not finish up with the actual install tomorrow because we may be short:eek: Friday will be spent tying up loose ends. Base boards, toilet, reducers and possibly cutting a few doors.
     

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  2. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    The floating floor is a Shaw pre-finished engineered wood floor. Prefinished top layer, MDF or HDF?core and another layer of actual wood on the bottom. This job is a tongue n groove glue together floating installation method but this product does have the option of being stapled or glued down. Obviously you would not use Selitac for the latter choices. Read your directions!!! This specific product is stapled through the groove side, not the tongue, if you should choose that option.

    The foil underlayment is Shaw Selitac. Nothing special that I know of other than the edges have a zipper locking mechanism. Take your time and zip them together neatly. Keeping the underlayment taut (not stretched) is essential for getting the zippers to zip cleanly through the entire length of your run. Put a couple of staples in one end, shuffle your feet on top of the underlayment on your way to the other end and put a couple more staples in. I then hit the staples with my hammer to guarantee that they aren't proud and won't cause any noise or issues under the finished product. For concrete you would tape the seams if you aren't using a 6 mil vapor barrier.

    The shop that this job is for does a lot of Shaw so I'm usually installing this or Floorte. We do not use Selitac under Floorte (LVT) but I would still go through the same steps for layout and installation.

    I like to use my Pergo straps in situations like this. Saves me money by not needing to buy a couple rolls of blue tape and they help to keep things racked up even with a couple guys are walking back and forth all day. I should point out that some engineered floors specify to NOT use straps during the installation so read your instructions. Regardless, I like to use my straps to really suck the boards together but I don't leave them on for long.

    On longer runs without T-moldings you really gotta leave a little extra in the gap around the perimeter. If the product calls for 1/4", leave 1/2" and so forth. We don't use 1/4 round here in the PNW, we remove and reinstall the existing base. So if the appropriate gap that you need is bigger than the base that you have, undercutting the sheet rock will get you an instant 1/2" of play at each wall. Humidity is not an issue in the PNW like it is in other parts of the country/ world so I rarely have to do this but it is an option and for some locations it may be a necessity.

    I've got a front door with side lights that I don't plan on using any reducers at as well as 2 gas fireplaces. I'll post some pictures of those processes tomorrow afternoon.
     
  3. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Looking real nice, Chris. Deserving of The Spotlight, for sure.
     
  4. Dan Schultz

    Dan Schultz Certified Wood Floor Inspector Charter Member

    IS that some of their Epic line?
     
  5. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Yes. Epic Plus. This specific flavor has mostly long boards and they are a touch wider than I usually get. Speeds things up a bit until you get to a closet.

    Today I had to shave a hare off the splines that we had to get a good fit. Brand new blade on the table saw, zero clearance insert and away we go. Test fit the modified splines and it's on.

    I took off a smidge of the wall on accident while removing the base boards. No biggie, I can fix that. Smear a touch of wood glue on the wall and re-adhere the piece and don't do that again!

    On to the front door. I broke out my undercut saw and buzzed across the entire front door/ side light section extending an inch or so into the sheet rock on either side. The door itself has a removable threshold where the wood will stop. I removed that and cut out some material on my table saw so it laps over the finished floor. The side lights were under cut but I needed a bit more while test fitting my pieces. The ol multi tool is perfect for these kind of things. As you can see from the side view of the side light, the floor extends under and yet it still has a sufficient expansion space. I reattach the modified threshold piece and all that needs to be done is a bead of silicone at the side lights. No reducers AND there is sufficient expansion space.
     

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