Pad: no staples, glue, or tape

Discussion in 'Carpet Q&A' started by Ca5, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Ca5

    Ca5 New Member

    I just had carpet installed in my condo. It's Shaw textured nylon carpet with 8 lb 1/2" rebond pad. It’s laid on gypcrete or something. It looks like concrete but it’s something softer. The previous pad was glued and the seams taped. Previous to that there are old staples around the perimeter. This time the installer started out stapling all the seams. I asked if he could use glue instead and said because I was concerned about the gypcrete cracking/chipping. Maybe silly of me but the previous pad with the glue seemed good. The installer said he didn’t have to use anything. So, the pad has no glue or staples and the seams are not taped. It seems fine right now. I’ve noticed no gaps or bumps. but, I wonder if this will be a problem after time with wrinkles or other problems.

    What do you think? What’s the risk or downside to this? What should I watch out for?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
  2. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    It’s probably the last thing I would worry about with your carpet installation.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Once carpet is installed over it there is no place for the pad to go. The only problem I could see if stapling was to let go the there might be a crunching sound when stepped on.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  4. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Without staples or tape the pad can ride up over the tack strip while being stretched or the pad could curl up over itself at the pad seams. If that hadn’t happened then you’re in the clear
     
  5. Ca5

    Ca5 New Member

    Thanks for all the replies.

    I wonder if there might be some gaps in the pad that I just can’t see yet, but over years the carpet will sag into the gaps?

    Might it be a problem if I ever need the carpet re-stretched?
     
  6. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Could be. According to CRI 105 you’re supposed to staple around the perimeter and use pad tape on the seams.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In I Support TFP Senior Member

    Was your installers name ' Slick Eddie ' ? :p

    It can be done, but it's risky business. I've done it in a pinch, but only with a quality pad with straight edges and lays flat. I usually spread the carpet first over the floor, then fold it back 6' 6''....lay the pad loose and fold cpt. back.
    Thank You Ca5 for stopping him from stapling the seams on gypcrete :)
    ....If it was up to me, I would promote duck tape pad seams period ! even on wood.

    For the past 17 years, I've run into all kinds of crazy pad installation methods at different apartment complexes, but by far my favorite one is ' Slick Eddie's ' loose lay method :D ....I'm not endorsing this, but if my back could speak, it would ;)

    Hopefully you'll be ok and thanks for sharing.

    This Crazy method added 1.50 hours for pulling staples :mad: Do you think I should charge extra ?
    image(35).jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Like said above, if it made it through the stretch then you're in the clear.

    Now if I were to do something like that you can best believe that pad would have shifted, rolled & bunched to a pile of nonsense. Glad your guy could make it work for himself.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    every bloody time i try and do something stupid i get caught. Its the universes way of kicking me in the behind for knowing better
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Funny Funny x 2
  10. I use to go behind a guy doing repairs where he wouldn’t tape or glue the seams and it gapped. His name was Phil and he was a hack. Customers called in, they could feel the gap walking on it. It was relatively new installs.
     
  11. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member Senior Member

    I have seen pad separate at the seams when nothing is holding it after years of it being installed. Gypcrete is soft and sometimes you can staple seams in it. One house basement I was in, the rubber pad separated 8" in the traffic zone of a hall.
     
  12. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    I once got an uncoated roll of koolglide tape unknowingly. Did my seam in a 22x28 bonus room. Got a call a couple weeks later that there was a bump in the carpet. Well it turn out that the uncoated tape stuck hard in a few spots even with using the seamerdown now and it separated the stapled pad seams by up to two inches in spots. Stretching correctly can really bite ya sometimes. I had to fold the whole room back in half, redo the pad , then re-stretch. All that to say, even with staples every three inches on the seams it can still move. I would never tempt fate unless i was absolutely desperate and a long way from home.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  13. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Back in the day when it was common to do kitchens, we used flat slab rubber pad. I had it happen twice in the same kitchen where the padcame off the staple pulling the through and the pad rolling up in front of a cupboard under the carpet. That was the only job I had that happen even though using that pad many times. We ended up gluing it the second time.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  14. The pad I was speaking of was 3lb big giant role of pink. Think it had instructions to open it up, lay it out for awhile.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  15. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    3lb, lol
     
  16. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain TFP Owner/Founder Administrator

    Foam pad, similar to Omalon (Omalon was yellow).
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. It was still rebond Jim, not prime Urethane 9/16” thick, it was light and the rolls were quite larger. The 6 lb pad was made extremely well, straight edges, compressed, then as the years went by maybe 5 or so the quality went way downhill, wavy edges, inconsistent thicknesses, it got way less dense, the fiberglass scrim got thinner, the spacing wider, chunks of hard plastic, what else to do wrong was there. So then they started touting 8lb pad.
     

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