OSHA Aerial Boom Lifts Safety

Discussion in 'Health & Safety Forum' started by epoxyman, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

    Got a tile job coming up on the beach side on a wall it's a tile mural
    have to rip down the old one and put up the new one here in a few weeks :eek: its around 500 sf give or take.

    But its 55 feet in the air good lord the stuff I do for money but I need to get OSHA Aerial Boom Lifts Safety card a guy told me to do it online
    but hmmm I just do not want to get taken in by a fly by night place LOL

    Do any of you guys know of this ?? I have my safety harness some were :)
    Ron.
     
  2. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    residential or commercial?
     
  3. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

    Commercial

    Its right on a main road with 2 condos going up near by
    So I know OSHA could be by or see us working
     
  4. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

  5. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Right, you understood exactly what I was asking. I couldn't advise you on the legitimacy of online accreditation specifically or generally. But it comes down to 2 very important risk factors as you well know. One is the actual potential dangers and potential training you could get to avoid those. The 2nd is the compliance technicalities--------how to "play the game" so you are safe and healthy AND not flying any red flags that will trigger some kind of OSHA enforcement action.

    So only you would know if a SERIOUS training is something you and your crew could appreciate or if it's only a matter of formal compliance with some minimal hours of "certified" class room hours. If you're confident you and your men will be safe I would just go to the cheapest onine course. Easy Money. (in their pocket)

    I only recall ONE job in my career being more than a few feet up off the ground and I was an employee. OSHA is all about EMPLOYEES. Technically Ron, they don't care if you kill yourself on this job where you are the employer. OSHA isn't charged with regulating YOU as far as how you proceed yourself. It's only when you begin directing subcontractors or employees that these regulation apply. The clearly stated aim of this federal program is to prevent you from putting your EMPLOYEES at risk.

    Enforcement is about as frivolous and capricious as anything could ever possibly be. It's just a really subjective thing regardess that the written rules are quite specific.
     
  6. icanlayit2

    icanlayit2 Pro Member

    I found this on the OSHA web site. But if you are working beside a road, in a lift, you will need more than the lift course. You will need all sorts of training, cause they need your profit more than you.....Lol . https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha2254.pdf
     
  7. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

    Yea on bigger jobs we do we have the once a week job meeting at our gang box and also the GC a one or two in the week too :eek:

    Me and my guy has been running lifts and diff stuff for over 25+ years just want to make sure I dont get a big mess going or one heck of a fine too my pockets are not that deep :eek:

    We will both have are safety harness on with the lanyards hooked to the bucket we even have the double lanyards when we do decking when there are no walls up yet crazy but true :blink:

    Also we have a about 500 page safety log we keep on site to with all the stuff we use and all the MSDA sheets the more I keep in paper the happier they are I have found out over the years.

    Thanks for the info guys
     
  8. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    If we all were forced to comply equally there should be ZERO impact on profit margin. Yeah, I understand that's a fantasy world equation. In the real world some dumbass low bids the the work without realizing all the onerous complications and costs.

    So he HAS to cheat just to break even. Where the OSHA folks are heavily involved.........COSTS skyrocket. But if we all understand that when we are bidding it THEORETICALLY becomes a neutral factor.

    My point here is no one should EVER be sacrificing their profit margin for safety or any government regulations. Were they enforced evenly the best company would win the bid and follow all the rules.

    Like everything else involving human beings though corruption comes into play.

    There's no accounting for that.
     
  9. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

    We will be about 20-30 feet off the road but the GC has to build some stuff to keep guys and this time of the year bums LOL out of our work place.
     
  10. epoxyman

    epoxyman Pro Member

    Yea back years ago our 1st job on a navy base was crazy meeting after meeting about 45min of paper work befor we start then about 20 min after work time good lord. We made money but wow lol

    But I was very lucky to have a great GC show us the way and then Ben from the corps of engineers helped us along to and I was very grateful for that they were great guys.
     
  11. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Sounds familiar.

    I could not have managed the Navy contract I'm charged with without a great deal of.........tolerance.........."help"........from the guys I have to deal with. DAMN though, there's a lot of money involved. I'm not above a little schmoozing where applicable.
     
  12. UncleCliffie

    UncleCliffie Charter Member

    In 1957 I was in charge of the synchro systems on the USS Northampton. The anemometer on the forward yard arm required servicing. I knew what had to be done, but there was no way I could crawl out on the yardarm to do the work since it was about 200' up in the air. Add to that the natural pitch and roll of the ship at sea. Soooo I grabbed me a striker (lower rated enlisted man) in my shop who told me heights did not bother him, and away we went. Up the mast to the yard arm and he crawled out on the narrow yardarm and performed the required servicing per my instructions.
    Many years later when the ship was scrapped, I was told my fingerprints were still embedded in the steel mast where I had held on while the work was being done.
    Dick
     
  13. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I'm not a fan of heights, Sunbelt rentals probably has info on the classes, they auction off a ton of those on iron planet.

    I would contact the setting material company (Mapei,Ardex,Laticrete) to have them send a tech rep. Out to evaluate and recommend products, and view setting method, work time, conditions etc.

    What's the reason for replacement, dated,faded?
     
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