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Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by greenbug, Sep 3, 2017.

  1. greenbug

    greenbug Member

    Hello, I am a DIYer who discovered this site when searching, 1) best way to remove vinyl tile adhesive from the concrete subfloor, (and, upon discovering an even worse problem (cat urine) :mad: 2) how to remove cat urine from concrete.

    I intended to stain/seal my concrete floor. House built in '75.

    This looks like a great site and, one which I will be spending a lot of time on as I search for solutions and flooring ideas.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  2. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    :welcome:We have a great search feature in the upper-right corner, or just find the most appropriate forum we have here and start a new topic. We'll do our best to help you out.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. greenbug

    greenbug Member

    Yes, I'm searching as we speak. thx
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Asbestos? Staining will usually show the squares from residue.
     
  5. greenbug

    greenbug Member

    The vinyl did not contain asbestos.

    The adhesive used on the vinyl did not come up when I removed the tile squares, (still in progress) probably because I used the wrong removal method, i.e. heat.

    Several years ago, in another room that had been carpeted, I cleaned/sanded the concrete as well as possible and used a non-reactive concrete wash and sealed it afterwards.

    The foundation/subfloor of my home is concrete and was/is not suitable to use the desired, acidic stain.

    The former owners had glued carpet in some rooms and vinyl, in others.

    As a result, the concrete had a combination of old mortar stains, glue, paint, etc., throughtout the house.

    Since I wasn't able to vacate the premises and pour a skim coat to achieve uniformity so that I could apply the acidic version of stain, I used the non-reactive semi-transparent formula in one of the rooms.

    Presently, in the room where I discovered the cat urine, I am still contemplating which treatment to use, porcelain tile or concrete "stain".

    I still need to remove the rest of the vinyl/carpet, plus, the newly discovered cat urine, which led me to this site.
     
  6. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Tile will be the easy and cheaper way to go given the position you are in today. I would treat the urine stains with bleach. Use fans and open the windows. Don't be afraid to use 2-3 applications of bleach til the stench is gone.
     
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  7. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Sorry to disagree with you incognito but mixing bleach with urine[ammonia] creates a very toxic gas. I did that once in a home and the homeowners had to vacate the house for 3 days. guess who had to pay the bill?

    :old:

    Daris
     
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  8. greenbug

    greenbug Member

    Really? I read on one of the posts re: cat urine that, when combined=noxious gas reaction....
    Thx
     
  9. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    You are mixing bleach[chlorine] with urine[ammonia] causing a reaction making a toxic gas, I don't remember the name but let me tell you it burns the eyes and takes your breath away. Speaking from experience here. If I remember right we had a woman die from it here a couple years ago.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  10. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I've done that in the past, like 20 years ago. And have poured the two in a trash can to prevent animals from knocking over. Both fresh together causes some serious visible toxic smoke.

    The correct way is the chemicals specifically designed for the urine whichever manufacturer is used. Here's one from Jon Don, but the steps/procedures are extensive, in the end there is a topical coating. It sinks deep into pores of slab if it wasn't sealed.

    This is basically for severity, minor accidents are ez!

    How to Clean Up Urine on Concrete Floors | Jon-Don
     
  11. greenbug

    greenbug Member

    Thanks Incognito. This is just one small area, but, to me, it's severe..
    Thanks for the info.
     
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