Military Vets Can Get Floor Installation Training

Discussion in 'Industry News, Training & Organizations' started by Jim McClain, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

  2. Bud Cline

    Bud Cline Tile Expert Charter Member Senior Member Published

    WOW! That's a long read but good for them. I wonder if the fact that both organizations are more-or-less Nationwide will have an effect on the availability of training in more places. I certainly hope so.
     
  3. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I really think things are coming together in the industry as far as training. Not so sure of the pay side.

    I used my GI bill for flooring training in Minnesota, I put in 1100$ and got back 1100$, at the time I think they paid up to 10.5k, wasn't interested in college.

    I hope it works out for the guys that get into it and I hope the reality of not making much money is ok.
     
  4. Roland Thompson

    Roland Thompson Charter Member Senior Member

    I am trying to figure out how why, it is said you can not make money installing. It has done me very well through the years. I put all 5 of my children thru a private school. Paid my bills, own my home and still can go to trainings. It all comes down how you market yourself.
     
  5. Elmer Fudd

    Elmer Fudd Administwative Asst. Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I am like Rock, anyone can make money in this business, IF they are willing to work hard, diversify if needed, and not be foolish with their money.

    I apologize to no one for the things that flooring has given me.... family of 4, all educated.... 1 nurse/1 teacher/1 missionary/1 engineer. And a home that will be paid for this year. I have personally been to 5 of the 7 continents and lack for nothing materially. Sure I am 67 and still working, but that is MY choice.

    House below.
     

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  6. Nate Hall

    Nate Hall Types With Elbows Senior Member Published

    Carpet installation has paid for more than I can list here but I have a house and two productive members of society.A step daughter as well. The whiners get a lot of press but there are successful installation professionals out there too.
     
  7. Majwoody

    Majwoody Pro Member

    I am currently using my GI bill to pursue a business technology degree. To be honest, most the guys I served with are lazy and carry a sense of entitlement. To add to it, a lot of guys I deployed with immediately started college after our tour because the GI bill plus unemployment was more than they could make working. I got into flooring as a teenager, strait out of a substance abuse program. This trade has given me the means to support my family and served as a new path in my life when I needed it most. The money is ok but for me, it's pride and drive that make this trade great. Most in this trade have not clue what I'm talking about.
     
  8. Bud Cline

    Bud Cline Tile Expert Charter Member Senior Member Published

    What happened to that guy that was here last winter that was going to open a new installation training school somewhere? Did that ever happen?
     
  9. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    The daily installers are not making good money, but I agree, it's what you make of it.

    Maybe I'm basing my opinion on what I see them all driving around in, and I have a hawk eye on the street, I can see a flooring vehicle from 200 yards away.

    Basic installer around me only makes about 30k a year after deductions.
     
  10. Elmer Fudd

    Elmer Fudd Administwative Asst. Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    And while that is not great money, for a youngster starting in the business it is ....well OK. It is still $15 bucks an hour and within a few years can be parlayed into twice that. Is it a tough gig???? Oh yeah but ambition can help to overcome that.

    The real issue I have with it is that there is little business training that that youngster can get to put him on the right path. CFI is good but is only a starting point, if there is a chapter that has regular meetings then he has a leg up. Problem is that the chapters are few and far between.
     
  11. Roland Thompson

    Roland Thompson Charter Member Senior Member

    He can always come to the Delmarva chapter:D
     
  12. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    There's a few jobs out there where the conditions and pay are even worse. Just a few though.
     
  13. Nate Hall

    Nate Hall Types With Elbows Senior Member Published

    The Wisconsin chapter has held business seminars but they are not well attended. Guys don't know how much they don't know.
     
  14. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    You know how hypnotists say a word and the subject is out? Say the word business and installers drop their heads.
     
  15. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Just thought that bared repeating. Loudly.
     
  16. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Kinda like a union meeting, huh? Membership of nearly a thousand and if 20 guys show up it's an overflow crowd. They all complain about the contract, the President, the Business Agents........but they don't READ the contract. They don't know who their reps are. They refuse to even show up at a meeting. Yeah, I'm guilty as charged, Sir. Can't get "the working stiff" to understand the business end of the business.

    Fact is they just want to WORK..............not think, not learn, not argue, not negotiate.

    We're just workin' FOOLS as we sometimes say.
     
  17. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I am on a training this week. I inquired about the Goodwill thing and was told it is basically to get vets off the streets and instill some ambition. Basically when they do these training they are "somewhat" educated helpers. Being a gopher, sweep, carry tools, that sort of thing.
    I hadn't heard anything about it before Monday, and then here. I guess it is sponsered by Goodwill Industries.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  18. Majwoody

    Majwoody Pro Member

    I started contracting at 20 years old. I knew more about the dope business than running a small sub contractor business. Fortunately, I never put myself into a position to fail. When I made the jump to commercial work, I realized I was way out of my league and winging it off common sense wouldn't get me through. There is no money to be made in my are unless you are a contractor. Period. If there was another option here, I would explore it. At this point, I'm "pot committed" and will continue my current path.
     
  19. Bud Cline

    Bud Cline Tile Expert Charter Member Senior Member Published

    I don't understand any of those statements! How about some elaboration?
     
  20. Majwoody

    Majwoody Pro Member

    1. I am more comfortable dealing with a $10k contract with a homeowner than a $100k contract with a GC, Architect, landowner, and any other stakeholder. I was self taught on the business end until last year. I found that common sense would get me by for the most part. It's a lot easier to posture yourself with a homeowner who doesn't do more than two or three flooring projects in their lifetime, as opposed to those in the commercial world who have lawyers on speed dial and love to toss the phrase "liquidated damages" around.
    2. I meant in my area. The most I have seen a journeyman floor layer make as an employee here is $25/hour. Right now the highest guy I know makes $20 and most others closer to $15. The work is no more steady for them than myself at an hourly minimum of $35/hour. Prevailing wage jobs are done by contractors working as employees and there is not enough of those to stay busy.
    3. I would love to drop my liability insurance, three bonds, workers comp, payroll company, license, and obligation to continuing education in trade for a decent salary, company rig, and provide a toolbox of hand tools so I can reclaim half my garage and convert my office to a man cave.
    4. Poker term. When you dump so much money into the pot you feel forced to play your shitty hand.
     
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