Layout Question

Discussion in 'Hardwood and Laminates Q&A' started by jgruver, May 15, 2018.

  1. jgruver

    jgruver New Member

    I'm looking for feedback on my plan to lay hardwood. Thanks in advance for your time. I'm laying 3/4" solid hardwood. The baths, entry, and kitchen will be tile (which I'll be laying later), but everywhere else is going to be wood. The joists run parallel to the short side of the outline of the house (up and down in this picture) and I plan to go perpendicular to the joists meaning the wood flooring would be parallel the the length of the house. I'd like to avoid using transitions at the doors to the bedrooms. I thought I'd start in the hallway on the side closest to Bed 1 and 2. As I continue that first row out of the hallway and into the open area between the living and dining room, I thought I'd just continue to face nail. Is that right? Then I thought I'd use splines to build off that row into the dining room and into Bed 1 and Bed 2. Going the other direction, I plan to build of the last row of the hallway to go into the master and the living room.

    I also had a question about expansion and contraction in large rooms. The living room area is about 20'x20' and is obviously connected to the dining room. The installation instructions say to use an aluminum spacer for rooms larger than 20'x20'. I've searched for that online, but haven't been able to find what they're talking about. I've also heard splines can help with expansion and contraction (though I'm not entirely sure what that would be true). Should I do anything special between living room and dining room? I do live in a climate that's very cold in the winter (which means dry in the house from the furnace) and humid in the summer. We try to keep up with dehumidifiers in the summer, but I think there will still be a certain amount of variability in the humidity among seasons. Of course, I'll be putting the wood down soon, so it will be a more humid part of the year.

    Thanks again!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    Ok, so here we go....
    Your plan is kinda there... But here is the "professional" ish way to go about it.

    I like your plan of starting in your hallway, its good for a few reasons. One, you can line your hardest (most crucial) sight line and be done with it. Two, by starting there you split the direction the wood will be installed. Conventional wisdom states that hardwood expands in the direction of the tongues so by splitting the direction, you split the expansion!

    As for continuing your row with face nails (yes you got it right) you don't want to do that. What you want to do is lay a chalk line that is going to be your lay line. Then when you come out of that hallway secure some 2x4 or ripped plywood (preferred) to the floor along the chalk line that is your lay line then you can nail into it as if it was sitting against other hardwood, which is referred to as blind nailing. This eliminates the need for unsightly top nails.

    As for aluminum spacers, i am miffed, however in dry seasons where we are POSITIVE the humidity will rise sometimes i may have been known to install using washers (you know, the bolt and nut kind) to space a row every now and again. These days people lose their marbles if there wood isn't "perfect" so i gave up on that....

    The best thing you can do for the "climate" of the wood would be to install a humidifier on your furnace, if this is not feasible then you should be prepared to accept that character of wood flooring. It will contract and expand, there is no avoiding this unless under controlled conditions. For the record, not trying to be a dink on that, just is the way wood is.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. jgruver

    jgruver New Member


    Thank you! That was helpful.
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.