Installing LVT over existing Engineered Hardwood

Discussion in 'Vinyl Flooring Q&A' started by Tinnocker, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. Tinnocker

    Tinnocker Pro Member

    I'm wondering if it is acceptable to install a click together floating LVT plank over the top of an existing glued down engineered hardwood floor.
    The engineered hardwood is about 5/8" thick installed over 1/4" underlayment and is well adhered. It is also on the 1st floor over a basement. The new LVT would be running the same direction as the old hardwood.
    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. SteveG

    SteveG Pro Member

    Which product are you going to be using? What does the manufacturer allow for a substrate?
     
  3. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    I highly doubt there would be a problem as long as the existing wood floor is flat. I would do it without much hesitation.
     
  4. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    What could happen is moisture being trapped under vinyl causing hardwood to cup telegraphing to the surface.
     
  5. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Tippy tap

    You only need to tap around with something solid like a hammer, puttly knife, handle side of a screw driver......to get a feel for how SECURE the existing floor is bonded.

    So long as there are not significant "hollow" sounding spots or anything heaving up in any inordinate way you can certainly overlay with a floating floor system. Please read and follow the instructions carefully as each product requires certain specific conditions and you want to meet those standards or better.
     
  6. Tinnocker

    Tinnocker Pro Member

    Thanks for all the good info.
    I will make sure to check with the manufacturer to see if this is allowed.
    I also worry about the moisture being trapped between layers.
     
  7. j248

    j248 Pro Member

    what is the one word in between how and the? my computer only goes up to font size 1 zillion...My computer is mean to me, maybe because i always call it slow
     
  8. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    ********************************


    secure
     
  9. j248

    j248 Pro Member

    oh that makes sense more than my sense of sarcasm
     
  10. I have a burning question about this idea of going over engineered hardwood: does it have a bevel on it? If so, how do you want to manage the telegraphing of the little bevel "valleys" through to the surface of the vinyl? If it is a bevelled engineered hardwood (not all are bevelled...but most are) how do you propose to "span" the gaps left by the bevels?

    One thing vinyl planks HATE is uneven/bumpy/valley-filled subfloors. And bevels are lovely little void/valleys. If this engineered wood has a bevel, the vinyl may have issues.

    Inquiring minds...
     
  11. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    If there's a beveled joint I would recommend gluing down a layer of white felt paper. That would be sufficient.
     
  12. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    Floating planks won't telegraph a bevel unless it's extreme
     
  13. j248

    j248 Pro Member

    they can depending upon the subfloor and the thickness of the plank. 4mm minimum would be my suggestion and its imperfection and so on. Also as mike said, water can get under it and that is where mold grows
     
  14. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    I agree. But it was the standard procedure for generations to paste down a layer of felt over hardwood flooring, typically strip floorboards--but any and all hardwood would automatically get a layer of felt to absorb any expansion/contraction or telegraphing issues.

    It only takes a few minutes and even today the white felt is pretty cheap. I say do it.
     
  15. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I was thinking moisture vapor being blocked from traveling. I guess I would monitor and control the humidity toward the low end in the basement.

    What's supposed to occur is a layer of underlayment (1/4" well fastened) had to say it!
     
  16. Elmer Fudd

    Elmer Fudd Administwative Asst. Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Like Incognito, I started in the trade in the NYC area, and a layer of felt paper was the panacea for many flooring issues. However as time went on and I worked in several different areas I found that no one else was dong that. Never bothered to find out why just went along with what was normal in the area.
     
  17. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    I can answer that one for you there Old Timer. We were doing those things in our apprentice days because it was SPECIFIED in the contracts of city, county, state and federal contracts. Every architect and general contractor used the same specs out of force of habit for any and all substantial commercial jobs. Besides that is was also required by the manufacturers and industry standards. Union men would INSIST on following these kinds of rules for.......obvious reasons-------the job takes longer when you do things right. Cut corners in those days? Good luck getting paid.

    The boss made a healthy buck off the deal. We all made a nice living. It was ALWAYS a good idea for the end user in my opinion even to the extent it was somewhat overkill. In the year 2016 we are so far off on the other extreme of cutting corners it's confusing to look back and wonder why installers did things "by the book" to begin with.
     
  18. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    The white felt paper, seemingly exact product attached to sheet vinyl was used around here for under ceramic tile to prevent tile from cracking(crack isolation ) it worked for that purpose as most of the shrinking of concrete ended up showing gaps in the grout joints. So most of the adhesive failed leaving hollowness under tile. Makes for easy removal though.
     

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