Installing LVP in large area...?

Discussion in 'Vinyl Flooring Q&A' started by jwr0201, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. jwr0201

    jwr0201 New Member

    I have a project coming up to do in a living room and small dining area. We live in a small villa and don't have much room to move furniture to allow a fully clear total area to lay the LVP. The two rooms together form sort of an "L" shape. My question is this; would it be possible to move all the furniture into one of these rooms and do the other room first, then move the furniture into the LVP laid room and finish the second room - without worry of fitting the planks together and having gaps or buckles? I'm talking about having a like pattern throughout the entire area without transition strips.
    Advice and recommendations requested and greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Incognito

    Incognito No more Mr. Nice Guy! I Support TFP Senior Member

    Read the manufacturer's instructions or call their technical department. Generally speaking, "floating" or "click-lock" installations have specific prohibitions against larger spans and multiple rooms/areas without transitions.

    There are a lot of different brands and types of "LVP"

    To do what you want I recommend a glue down plank. There would be zero complications regarding the sizes or configuration of the areas or how you bounce furniture back and forth.
     
  3. jwr0201

    jwr0201 New Member

    Forgot to include this info...
    Total area is 394 sq ft. Larger room is approx. 15 X 20 and smaller adjoining doom is approx. 9'9" square. Total run through both rooms is 29'6".
    Is the 29 plus feet too long to do in a single run, or should I have a transition strip between the rooms?
    Thanks!
     
  4. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    Is this a floating floor, LVP install? What do your directions say? A lot of times, there may be a sheet of general installation spec's, with a reference to more specific info on the web. It's important to know what you are buying. I agree with Incognito, glue down LVP is your best bet. Floating floors are touted as being "easy to install". That can be true, after you've installed a few...
     
  5. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Shifting furniture is sometimes the only option. Not efficient, but move the small room out into large, strip flooring, then shift everything out of large, strip, lay, then as you get most of area done sheet ft furniture into large area.

    I would not use transition, but may void a warranty.
     
  6. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    What product are you looking at installing? They are not all created equal and eliminating a transition strip may be asking for trouble. If it should fail and you didn't follow the instructions to a T, you are on your own.
     
  7. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    For me, this is the best part of plank LVP, floating floors or hardwood. I don't have to move the big stuff completely out of the room.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    True, we do use that to our advantage now and again. Fridges that need taking apart to get out of kitchens, large tables, china hutches.
     
  9. jwr0201

    jwr0201 New Member

    Product is Lifeproof floating LVP from HD. Planks are 8.7" X 47.6".
    Will review company's full install specs. Thanks for the advice on that!
     
  10. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    I did an installation of a similar product last week, 9"x 60". Website said, "no acclimation, 100% waterproof, totally inert, but said it needed 5/16" expansion per 20ft of installed length and width. If yours is similar, then using a baseboard of 7/16" width will give you that. You could also undercut your drywall to give extra expansion space, if needed. Make sure you understand what they are telling you, use the tech info and call for clarification.
     
  11. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    I just got done doing an install with that product. Pay close attention to the long joints and making sure that they are fully seated. I ran my fingers back and forth across the joint over the length of every plank. You can feel if it is fully locked or not. If it's not, a couple gentle taps with a block and you are golden. Butt the tapping block against the plank itself. The tongue is easily damaged and I mean easily so tap from the groove side. Most planks need some sort of tap. It took me a bit longer to install than other similar products but the finished product looks good. I would eliminate the T-mold if it was my own house but just know that that will likely be a disqualifier should any problem arise down the road.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. jwr0201

    jwr0201 New Member

    Great info here. Finally found the installation guide from the manufacturer - HD is not much help there. Turns out my project area will need no transition strips. (transition T-molding is required in the following cases: floors spanning greater than 30 ft. in width and 50 ft. in length).
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. Steve Olson

    Steve Olson Hardwood/Laminate Guru Charter Member Senior Member

    That is so important. The planks won't lay flat if not fully engaged. One trick to avoid damaging the tongues, is to use a scrap of the material, engaged to the edge you are tapping between the flooring and the block. this is more important when tapping on the tongue, then on the groove, where you can place the block so your GENTLE taps will not damage the locking joint. Finesse is your best tool when working with these products
     
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