Engineered hardwood on concrete slab

Discussion in 'Solid and Engineered Hardwood Q&A' started by Tylerj135, Sep 11, 2019 at 1:21 PM.

  1. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Hello, I am looking for some advice on installing engineered hardwood flooring on a concrete slab. I’ve been told different things by different people so would love to get some stuff cleared up.

    Firstly, is Underlayment or plywood required or recommended to go on top of the concrete slab in my floor before I install?

    Secondly, would it be necessary to glue the boards together or can I just click them in?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    The specific product you choose will determine the installation method. Do you already have a product in mind? Some have multiple options: glue, staple or float. First things first, you should have some moisture testing done to see what’s going on with your slab to see if wood is even a suitable choice or what extra steps need to be taken to make it a suitable choice. Something else to consider is how flat is your slab.
     
  3. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Thanks Chris, I actually own the flooring already. It says it can be glued, stapled, or floated. But I imagine that is all variable depending on what it’s going on top of, etc.

    It is a hickory engineered hardwood.

    I will indeed check the moisture.
     
  4. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Most people float it because that is the easiest and most economical. I’m not a fan of glue down but it does have its place. Which specific product do you have? Lots of knowledge here on TFP. Give us a bit more details and I’m sure we will have you set up for success.
     
  5. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Nantahala Plank FP10040644- HSHA5 Harvest
    Hickory 1st Quality 5

    I don’t want to have to glue it down. But I don’t want any creaks or separation of planks either.
     
  6. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    Best method in basement is a sleeper and nail down, it is insanely cost prohibitive and you will lose 1.5 inches or so of ceiling height. It involves installing a plywood subfloor on sleepers allowing for moisture mitigation and nail down installs. It's my favorite because I can then nail down my hardwood. Personal preference.

    A close second is glued down. With the advancements in silane adhesives many of these systems can and will create a moisture barrier between the concrete and the hardwood. To my knowledge 95% rh is as high as I have seen. You will never have a hollow separated creaky floor when it is glued down correctly

    If you want cheap and easy, roll out some underlay and float it until your hearts content... I have much to say about floating hardwood installations but I will save that rant for another day.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Thank you for response.

    This is not going in basement, first level of house on concrete slab. House has no basement or crawl space. I don’t want to go up 1.5 inches as that would cause issues for doors and such.
     
  8. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I’ll be waiting for that another day Mark. Why do I hate it so much I cannot fathom.

    Does it interlock or is it tongue and groove?
     
  9. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Glue is expensive, floating is cheap. If your slab is already sufficiently flat, or properly prepped to be flat, you should be just fine. You appreciate the floating installation when it comes time to replace the floor years down the road.
     
  10. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Believe it’s tongue and groove. Have to look at it to see if interlock but don’t think so.

    But I still have to glue the tongue and groove right?
    Is making sure it’s flat sufficient, or need Underlayment also?
     
  11. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I have a Urethane adhesive removal estimate tomorrow actually. Water Damage job I assume.
     
  12. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    You would need a couple bottles of T&G glue and some wood floor tape. (Blue tape but not blue tape if that makes sense) There is usually an underlayment that goes with a floating installation as well as a vapor barrier if it’s not already part of your underlayment. All that will still be significantly cheaper than the urethane adhesive you would need for a glue down installation. You want your slab to be flat. Generally no more than 3/16” dip or hump over a 10’ span.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    2mm Underlayment with valor barrier is sufficient thickness?
     
  14. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    That’s for you to decide. The underlayment helps to muffle the noise of living on a floating floor. I put some laminate in my kitchen with no underlayment and honestly I didn’t notice any difference. I wouldn’t do that in a customers house though. We use a lot of Shaw Selitac or Pergo Gold but there are plenty of other options out there.
     
  15. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    I literally have no idea if 2mm makes difference, is that a lot or a will do nothing?
     
  16. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    2 MM would be something like Floor Muffler. Yeah, that works. I’ve installed lots of floors over that.

    FD4B1D61-A647-4D2F-9CBB-54BCD1FFBAF3.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Thank you
    Any advice on how to lay the flooring in the house?
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Would love to hear your cliff notes version on this.
     
  19. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    You doin the whole house? I’d go left to right on your plans. I tried googling the instructions for your floor but I must be having issues or something aside from my normal issues. I think the biggest problem with floating floors is people not following the instructions. If you want your installation to be successful you gotta follow the rules for your specific product. Floor flatness is not optional, it’s a requirement. Expansion space is not optional. You have a big house, you will definitely need T-molds at doorways.
     
  20. Tylerj135

    Tylerj135 Member

    Yes doing the whole house. So perpendicular to the front door?
    Regular expansion space at walls or I have to do more because of the large space?

    T molding at front door or literally every door into a new room?
     
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