Decided to replace old carpet with laminate flooring.

Discussion in 'Hardwood and Laminates Q&A' started by MartinM1982, Jun 29, 2016.

  1. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    Hi all,

    So glad I just found this community, so I finally decided to replace my old shag carpet in my basement mancave (concrete sub-floor), that the previous owner had built a closet AND a door wall on top of.

    My question is 2 fold. As we are completely removing all carpet and underlay and replacing it with laminate, what would be the best way to get it out from under the doorway/closet without damaging either of them ?
     

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  2. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    If the wall is solid, then just use a very sharp utility knife to cut the carpet and pad flush to the side of the wall and other obstacles. Keep sharpening the blade or replacing it - blades are cheap, frustration is not. Use a chisel to cut away the tackless strip.

    Once you get the new flooring installed, trim it out with new baseboards, which will hide the ugly you couldn't get out.

    If the wall isn't solid though, you're just gonna have to do something different. You'll want to shoot the guy who did it, but don't. They prob'ly have some stupid law against that. If you can't make the wall solid, you'll have to remove and rebuild it.
     
  3. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Like Jim said just cut it away. If wall isn't solid you could cut a small hole just above the plate in the dry wall and drill a hole then a Tapcon screw to hold it in place. Make sure the hole isn't above the base line.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  4. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    Yeah, the wall doesn't appear to be solid (doorway wall) I can fit a screwdriver underneath it on one side, the other however has seemed to have had the drywall wedged into the carpet, (it doesn't appear to be fixed in just wedged really firmly.

    The worse issue is that underneath the closet it seems the previous owner fixed the closet framing directly to the concrete subfloor through the carpet. I'm considering knocking down the closet and rebuilding it, but this is quite a hefty job for a beginner such as me.
     
  5. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    You are thinking of knocking down the closet wall just to remove the carpet? Doesn't sound like to smart a move to me when all you have to do is cut it away. Just saying. :poke::brick::coffee:

    :old:

    Daris
     
  6. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    I'm not sure what you mean by cut it away? Cut the frame away? Cut the drywall away? Atm it seems the frame in the closet is fixed to the concrete through the carpet.

    Sorry for the ignorance I'm brand new to diy.

    Also one other thing when laying laminate do installers typically lay it UNDER closets or would they lay it UP TO the closet then start again on the inside of the other side of the frame?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  7. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Cut it away means taking a knife and cutting it as close to the wall as you can.
    As far as the laminate goes , no it does not go under walls. You have to leave a gap from the wall for expansion. Read the rules the manufacturer usually has in the boxes tells you how far away from objects for expansion. Another thing with laminate is you can't lock the product down where it can't move in the expansion/contraction process. I'm not a laminate person so maybe some of them will chime in.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  8. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    So we got most of the drywall taken down now.

    (The closet needs to be completely rebuilt the person that made the closet and doorway obviously didn't know what they were doing)

    We have a contractor coming tomorrow to give us a quote but I'm just curious what u guys think as to the amount of work will go into replacing that doorway, I'm far from an expert but that door doesn't look I'm any way shape or form load bearing to me.... see pics.
     

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  9. Elmer Fudd

    Elmer Fudd Administwative Asst. Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    At a minimum you need a top plate and jack studs (see red lines).
     

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  10. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Both of those doorways/walls were built by someone who knows nothing about construction. Neither are load bearing, but I'm not so sure the main door (second pic) shouldn't be.
     
  11. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    I had exactly the same opinion (that the guy who owned the house before didn't know what he was doing) and everything I have watched on YouTube in the past 3 days tells me it's built awfully.

    As for load bearing what do u mean by " not sure if shouldn't be" ?? You think it is load bearing?? For clarity this is what's directly ABOVE that doorway/wall. Basically the landing stairs/ bannister. (See pic).
     

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  12. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    I'm not a construction engineer, so I can't tell you if the wall is load bearing. It might be, though, if it is supporting the edge of the floor above. A load bearing wall would need a proper header. See the difference in the photos below. Non-load bearing walls don't need that kind of beefy header, but they still need to be constructed properly.

    When I remodeled my own bedroom, I took the attached bathroom wall down and re-built it with a pocket door. Since I couldn't be positive it was a load bearing wall, I made sure it was built like it was. I made the header from two 2x8s sandwiching a half-inch plywood.
     

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  13. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    Thanks for the info, I'm pretty sure in my/our case the doorway itself isnt load bearing, mainly because the two walls next to it dont seem to have been attached to the door way before. Not sure how clearly you'll be able to see it from these pictures but I'll attach them anyhow. Note where the green paint is. Is the original wall. (This is the doorway left side stud.

    The last two pictures are the upper inside of the closet. The first few are around the doorway which I believe was added as an afterthought to the house (likely bought with an unfinished basement which the owner halfed to make an extra bedroom)

    As for whether it's load bearing or not I guess I'll have the contractor take a look tomorrow when he arrives, see what he thinks. Thanks all the same guys , this place seems like a good resource.
     

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  14. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I would say the wall directly under the stairway wall is your load bearing wall.If you can see above the ceiling look for a triple floor joist.
    I'm not an engineer either but fool around with a little carpentry.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  15. MartinM1982

    MartinM1982 Member

    The stairway is located directly behind the back wall of the closet. The doorway to the left of it that we plan to pull up was built next to the stairway wall if that makes sense so if u go through the doorway there, then look to your right ,there is a little cupboard under the stairs then there is a stairway to the left of the cupboard which takes u to the front door, then behind u Is the stairway to the landing which leads being stood pretty much on top of the doorway.

    Like I said I'll see what the contractor says tomorrow, just one more question people, any rough guesstimate of how much $$$$ work like this is likely to cost??? I know u can't give accurately (I'm based in CT,usa) but a rough estimate would be cool, for a closet re-framing and rebuild and a doorway replacement? This is pretty much the first "remodel" I've ever done or had done.
     
  16. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    We're all flooring professionals, not builders. Only a few of us have done actual construction work and we are scattered all over the world. There is no sucha thing as "rough estimate" in a situation like this.
     
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