Cut, Drilled,Chiseled Concrete for Floor Outlet

Discussion in 'Flooring Potpourri' started by Mike Antonetti, Oct 7, 2017.

  1. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    New Home, Builder builds, then sells,(model home?) new owner wants floor outlet. Builder draws layout, just wanted me to cut concrete, and I'm thinking those outlet boxes are big, so I go back and forth with details, I say I need box onsite, and I my as well remove tile and thinset while my equipment is on station, same price, tile guy just has to set. I figured 4 hours, 200$ just because he kept me in mind for more work. I did another small floor bathroom for him @ 250$, and a few other jobs, so deal he gets (in my mind)
     

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  2. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    Looks really good Mike. Tile guy will love you!! At least he better :)
     
  3. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    That's my angle as well. Now he (whoever He is) may recommend us for other removal jobs. I requested builder to tell the tile/stone/marble/travertine setter to put crack suppression down as the slab is weakened in this spot.
     
  4. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    what were you using to get such a small tile area out?? Kinda like an air chisel or what??

    Also what did you use to cut that trench?? not a lot of room to get a saw base in.
     
  5. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I think the channel width was 2-1/2", tried just to use the Bosch 2" chisel bit but the concrete was blasting out beyond the width of chisel up to an inch more, so I had to sawcut 1-1/2" down. For the small tile I outlined the outlet box which is erratic, then used an sds 1/4"? drill bit spaced about 1/2" apart 4" down. The Bosch 11264 with a 1" wide bit chiseling from the center toward the drill holes which kept the chipping out straight downward and not cone shape toward bottom. I used a 3/4" drill bit to ream under the sill plate under the wall. Would like to have had the electrician to go over any details that are/were needed, think I'll ask the GC to give me feedback or sparky to call me for this type work in future. Few weeks ago I declined a 20 ft. Trench a homeowner asked me about along with tile removal, they did not call back, nor I them. Kinda price shopping.

    For sawcutting if the 4" blade isn't deep enough I put the 8" diamond blade on the 4" grinder( variable speed on low) pictured top right.
     

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  6. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    I never thought to just up and put an 8 inch blade on my 4 inch. Damn man, why are the simple things always so hard....or is that the hard things so simple.
    Thanks for that. I'll say it again, nice work.
     
  7. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    As long as you can turn the rpm's down and use continuous dry blade, it's little dangerous when the blade is serrated, the fingers can recess in the groove of blade and along comes the higher portion of blade not caring what's in front of it. The continuous rim diamond blade you can put soft skin against, if it hits solids, like bone then it will start to sand down. Finding the right blade to fit on the arbor is a bit tricky to find, got one at lowes couple years ago when I needed to cut along floor and wall for floor removal without damaging wall tile. The blade was at angle so the spindle nut stayed away from wall to prevent damage.
     
  8. seamsealer

    seamsealer Pro Member

    Nice job Mike, very nice. I remember going back to jobs and repairing vinyl floors because some one forgot something and it had to be patched in to make it look nice again. I never saw that nice a job done for me when I went back.
     
  9. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Thanks, I'm not a fan of floor outlets, owner is closing on home in couple weeks. I got a little punch list I'm not feeling good about some things I saw staring at me while I moved around the house.

    I'd really like to control the whole operation, when electrician gets there if additional chiseling needs to be done, setting the outlet level in both directions, filling in solid any voids, under the box, around the conduit, proper crack suppression. Setting stone what's done has already been done. We set that stone and pattern at a friends house, we used unsanded grout looked much better.

    Ok so my punch list, door thresholds move, a grout color matched caulk goes there. The stained fiberglass door the handle shifted revealing unstained spot.
    Bedroom doors rub on carpet, that'll leave wear pattern of the door sweep. Carpet was loose as I passed over the bed entrance with vac.
     

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  10. seamsealer

    seamsealer Pro Member

    Door thresholds, hmmm, our door from the garage to the house never had any construction adhesive put under it when they installed the door, now the threshold moves and makes noise when you step on it. I may try to get some adhesive under it from the garage side, if I can. Tradesmen down here leave a lot to be desired. Maybe 1 in 10 is real good at what they do, sad to say.
     
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  11. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I agree, Ormand Beach probably has better contractors there than on this side, went to builders job fair yesterday, scoping out some field techs for my house prior to the hiring.
     
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