Colored Cork queries...

Discussion in 'Cork Flooring Q&A' started by Grant H, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. Grant H

    Grant H I'd rather be patting my dog.

    doesn't that title just roll off the tongue:D

    I've laid this product before but not for a while now. The installation isn't an issue, my questions involve the site, and the tiles themselves.

    1. I've discovered on a manufacturers site that..."You can install cork tiles over hot water radiant heat (but not electric)". Any ideas to why water is okay but not electric ? Is water a more "Defused" heat while electric is more of a "Point" source maybe ?.

    2. Tiles seem to come in a set range of colors. Can anybody tell me why I could not buy "O'natural" tiles and custom color them to a customers preference ?

    Searching the web has given my ideas I haven't come across before for cork. Borders and inlays like I've never seen before. I'm hoping my client will pop outside the box for a bit and embrace their adventurous side on this one :yesss:

    She is a relative though...has anyone else noticed that jobs for friends and relatives you do as a favor tend to get really complicated and can turn to custard rapidly :eek:
     
  2. Jon Scanlan

    Jon Scanlan That Kiwi Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Grant have you checked out Cork Concepts
    I don't know what has happened to them since they now have new owners but they should be able to make any colour you like as each run of different colour is made to order, or at least it was when they were next door to us
    You should be still able to get the original cork as they once again used to paint/poly to order. If you get them prefinished they MUST have chamfered edges and not cut straight as there is now way one can get the heights of each tile to not show. Been there tried that. I haven't tried borders with coloured cork but would think where you cut them for the border would leave that height difference. To me the border would have to be chamfered and you would have to make the chamfer and then paint that
    Have you laid coloured cork?
     
  3. Grant H

    Grant H I'd rather be patting my dog.

    Yeah Jon. I've had a bit of experience with it over the years but always just the square tile look. Did some house lots even. They were quite popular here for a while in the eighties but no borders or rectangular ones though.
    All the "Plain" cork I've laid have been the standard square edge but as you said the coloured (yes I went there...coloUred :D) cork has had the beveled edge. I've had to straighten/square up/customize the odd one so am familiar with doing the bevel and using the supplied touch-up paint.
    Chrs for the linky, I'll have a nosy around on it.

    *edit You little beauty Jon. That site is exactly what I'm after. Since it's still a holiday here I wasn't able to start this research with the shops resources. I have next week off so will pop over to my rally then with this site to show her...Chrs mate.

    **second edit...sigh. Just realized I'm taking a holiday and still working in a way. This job gets in yer bones don't it lol.
     
  4. Jon Scanlan

    Jon Scanlan That Kiwi Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Grant you do realise one can leave a tile out and then shrink one in or even stretch the cork tiles if they are stepping when using that contact glue instead cutting a tile? ;)
     
  5. Grant H

    Grant H I'd rather be patting my dog.

    I've compressed them but didn't know they'd stretch :blink: good to know. The boss was a bit tight on tiles once so I had to creatively doctor up some waste ones once to complete a job...hence the custom bevel and paint job :cool:
     
  6. Jon Scanlan

    Jon Scanlan That Kiwi Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    They don't stretch that much :D
     
  7. A quick add-on here to the original, "You can install cork tiles over hot water radiant heat (but not electric)" Any ideas to why water is okay but not electric ?

    The answer is rather simple...but multifaceted. It has to do with heat out put of the various systems of radiant heat and the limitations of adhesives required for cork tile installation. Forced air and Hydronic have lower out put temperatures. These two systems are almost always sunk in rather thick cement which also helps to dissipate heat.

    The adhesives being used today are almost always "water" or latex based. Most are contact cement adhesives while some manufacturers still produce "anti-curl backing" which allowes for trowel-on applications. It doesn't matter. Both types of adhesives (contact or trowel-on) have temperature limits = +28 Celsius (82 F). Hydronic and forced air have difficulties pumping out temperatures above these temps...and then the cement then reduces the overall output a little bit more.

    Electric radiant heat, on the other hand, has a long and glorious (notorious?) history of "over heating". The coils often pump out temperatures well above +40 Celsius (105 F). These adhesives then "melt" in those areas = floor failure inside of a few weeks/months. This is the same for glue down vinyl, carpet, lino, etc. Anything that is an "indoor" adhesive has limits of +28 Celsius (82 F)

    The other fun thing about electric heat = fire risk. Cork takes a tremendous amount of heat to cause it to burn...but it will eventually burn. This is the other reason cork should not be used over top of electric heat.

    Even my cork floating floors are not allowed over electric radiant heat = fire risk together with risk of overheating.
     
  8. Grant H

    Grant H I'd rather be patting my dog.

    Thx Stephanie. Was wondering about that. Great info.
     
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