Chamfering linoleum edges....

Discussion in 'Vinyl Flooring Q&A' started by Ih8caulk, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. Greetings! Sent here from John Bridge forums......

    Lifeproof over mostly concrete. (Had ground level after nightmare with Home Depot installers who came ill prepared. (Grinder was great, wise and made house good)

    Ive got about 25sf of toilet area and the same for laundry. Both razor thin vinyl sheet (builder grade crap) and gonna lay over that. Curious about chamfering edges at the thresholds and again right up against bathtub where portion has lifted.

    How angled/wide a chamfer at thresholds and cut an inch or so the length of the tub. Or cut just that section and fill?? Thanks so much fir any advice!!
     

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  2. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Why not just scrape up the old? It is only 25 sq ft. Then everything would be nice and flat and no worries at the edges. From what I'm seeing the edges are starting to curl, you would have to cut it away and fill the gap with filler.

    :old:

    Daris
     
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  3. I actually would gladly do that, except Hone Depot is doing the install. So I don’t want to preempt their doing and they swear it’s good.

    I actually just got news that a new installer is coming today so we’ll see if they have an opinion. But this stuff is seriously so thin that it’s almost like having a layer of copy paper on the floor.

    And then is it fair to say that chamfer edges would just be a simple 45? Or maybe scratched in a little further?
     
  4. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    bevel it off as low as you can get a knife to go an fill it. Two or so inches from the tub is fine and dandy. If its loose keep going.
     
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  5. Thanks Mark! I’m a machine tooling guy so I can appreciate that. Give me a 5 degree chamfer from zero to 1/16” height like the world’s slightest shoreline grade from the tub to the toilet.
     
  6. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    You will never manage to achieve something so shallow with the flooring and a knife but you got the idea. The key metric you are going for is to expose as much of the flooring to the grade as you can while maintaining its adhesion. Presuming you are working with a builder grade mineral back material as you suggest (and i believe) you could mostly just whack it off at a 90 and go for it with fill floating a floor over it but why not shoot for the moon :)
     
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  7. Indeed! . In case it wasn’t already known, Lifeproof has its own underlayment and it’s what I’d call a medium pliability so I can see it easily eating up 1/16” or so without issue.

    Flooring co required *me* to pay for floor grinding so I’m putting it all on them to ensure it’s flat-flat or I won’t hesitate to call day or night for a fix. (Perks of not doing myself)
     
  8. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    If you’re gonna pay for grinding I’d sure as hell make sure they are following OSHA guidelines for silica dust and it’s containment. Not to be a dick but if you’re gonna charge someone for something you need to deliver on it otherwise it needs to be called something else... like prep.
     
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  9. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    I also feel bad for any poor floor layer going out to flatten a machinists floor... WTF is a 1000th of an inch :)
    Somewhere between the little tick and the littler tick?
     
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  10. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    We all know the caliber of installer that frequents the box stores. Not saying Chuck Norris couldn’t show up and prep your slab because I do box store work myself. But I am sayin 95 outta 100 times your gonna get fat, outta shape has been Stephen Segal who doesn’t even know about silica dust let alone it’s containment. In Oregon the HD service provider straight up quit doing any grinding when the new OSHA regulations went into effect. Let’s be honest with ourselves, how many installers out there even have an air scrubber or dust containment? I still get made fun of for having one by the same installers that want to borrow it.
     
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  11. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    It is amazing isnt it.
    Had a fellow installer get a job shut down a few weeks ago because they didn't have an exposure/containment plan documented and he was mad. This is the big league fellows, if you wanna work off of Craigslist by all means, carry on... but if you wanna play, learn the rules.

    I avoid all of it the best I can and skirt around as much legislation as I can when I can and where I can, im not gonna lie... but there is a time and place where one has to be at least prepared to man up.
     
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  12. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    The box stores have an army of lawyers that go over the exact verbiage that they use on their paperwork, marketing and pretty much every single word they use anywhere else that they use it so what’s the big deal with me holding them to what their lawyers have approved. If you’re gonna grind (or at least charge me for grinding) you better have your ducks in a row.

    And for the record the attached underlayment does not alleviate a 1/16” height difference. That needs to be prepped, or you just scrape up the vinyl before the installer gets there and save yourself $50. The underlayments I’m familiar with state that they will handle up to 1/32”. That’s nothing which is exactly why the underlayment is able to handle it. Underlayment does not negate the need for a properly prepped (flat) substrate. It does eliminate floor slap and that’s about it.
     
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  13. Got it! Ya they’re supposed check (and are responsible for) flatness. I already had a long talk with the local HD manager so they’re already figuring out a number for me having to wait a week since nobody bothered to mention floor might need leveling. (And I thoroughly reviewed their paper work and it’s surprisingly limited in even the “mention” of flatness. (Sad really)

    And while I live in .0001” every day, I understand the nature of the beast. In fact,I’d argue that ALL floors need leveling of some kind (@1/4” per 10ft) but I’d guess half lay floor anyway & call it a day.

    We’ll see how far they get today I see about 25% laid so far from the cameras that I can see from work. I’ll certainly be scrutinizing the quality.
     
  14. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    There is a certain part of me that someday wants to pay to have floora installed by *other* just so I can be an ass and pick it apart.... then there is a part of me that realizes that would make me an even bigger dick than I know I already am and there is no need for that. Also, there is no motive to this musing other than to illustrate perhaps that secretly i am a giant ass hole....

    Good luck with your floors. Also, yes, just about every single floor in the whole entire world technically needs to be "leveled" to come anywhere even close to that 3/16 in ten nonense. Its the stupidest spec ever written and should in no way pertain to floor covering seeing as there isnt even an agreed upon standard to measure it... but you my friend know what the word flat means and so does the flooring world. Shoot for flat, there is only one standard for that.
     
  15. Ha ha. Thanks Mark! I had to chuckle!

    I could probably do the job but in my years I’ve learned to help one time and then do your own the 2nd time so I passed on the opportunity to drive my mental self crazy! (I’m getting older & ornerier myself.).

    This time it’ll be nice to just have it done & not stress! (At least I think). LOL
     
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  16. Curiosity killed the cat.....

    So found out yesterday HD forgot to order quarter round for kitchen kicks. (No biggie m, found locally) but...looking at tub and fireplace transition, I’m thinking they’re going with MPR or some other shoe for those since the gaps seem much larger than for QR?

    Is there a “preferred” for those areas or is it whatever the floor co decides?
     

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  17. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Looks like they will be installing MPR’s and they will overlap the flooring but bump up to your tub and hearth. That’s gonna be some Steven Segal lookin transitions when they’re done.
     
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  18. Most all installers would scribe & calk/ undercut (the harth) in those areas.
    . Now you are going to have big,fat, gaudy transition pieces in there. Slim trim mpr!!

    Wtf home depot. Nothing but quality from big box. This is exactly why I always recommend local flooring shops with good reputation.
     
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  19. So they finished today but wife isn’t happy with tub. (I still haven’t been gone to see yet. I don’t think the fireplace looks bad but think I should ask them to redo with quarter round or no molding?



     

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  20. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    Yeah the fireplace looks like a thing, so that wouldn't set me off. Not how I would do it, but framed out it looks OK.

    That tub... well to steal a line from my buddy Chris45 imma have to say that looks like Chuck Norris kicked the crap out of fat Steven Segal. If anyone ever attempted to leave thst gaudy thing in my house I think I would have them drug out into the street and shot... as long as it never actually happens and this isn't entered as evidence at the trial.
     

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