Carpet Seaming

Discussion in 'Carpet Q&A' started by Randy, May 13, 2006.

  1. Randy

    Randy Charter Member

    Question for you: Like I was talking before about that seam. I row cut the top piece then I tried to trace cut it no go. It was like plowing yarn. Do you think it would work to row cut both pieces? What about keeping a straight line?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2010
  2. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    Hi Randy.... I'm the other Randy here. Most of the installers here row cut instead of straight edge their seams. I used to think a straight edge was the propper tool for seams, but these guys taught me different. I row cut most seams now. If the rows are bowed a little, then stay tack them so the pieces are straight and put em together. (after sealing of course) I use thermo on almost all seams now, but don't build it up real deep so that it will ooze up.
     
  3. Tex

    Tex Charter Member

    Hi Randy...

    Just reiterating what these guys have already said.

    Row cut both sides - if your rowcutting tool allows you to place the blade on either side - place it so it cuts closest to the row. Sometimes on these medium/low density products (this one looks like one) the rows are far enough apart that even if you row cut them - if you cut closest to the edge on both sides (instead of to the yarn row) you end up with what appears to be a missing row right at the seam. Does that make sense? Looks like this (where the "|" is the row):

    Looking down the row at floor height:

    |_|_|_|__|_|_|_|

    That gap in the middle leaves an area at the seam where the yarns on either side don't have any support so they fall into the gap.
     
  4. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    Nice description and visual, Tex.
     
  5. Floorguy

    Floorguy The Living Dead Charter Member Senior Member

    Yep, using the blade on the top cutter closest to the side your keeping, helps with the gauge between the rows when you put it back together.

    But in that piece, I would use one side of the blade, because you can compress too much and get a full high line.
     
  6. Lo Down

    Lo Down Old as dirt member Charter Member Senior Member

    You are saying, blade close side on one piece, blade away on the other one?... so you don't end up with this?
    l_l_l_l_ll_l_l_l_l
     
  7. Floorguy

    Floorguy The Living Dead Charter Member Senior Member

    Yes, especially when it has a wide gauge. If it is a tight narrow gauge, I'll swap blade sides.
     
  8. Randy

    Randy Charter Member

    Thanks so much

    Thank you very much I will try to row cut both sides.
     
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