Carpet Pad Installation

Discussion in 'Carpet Q&A' started by Mike Sliwinski, Jan 25, 2017.

  1. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In I Support TFP Senior Member

    I install padding w/ duck tape, not by the book and not as good as glue, but better than loose lay, middle ground seems like a good compromise to me. I probably have a few other Mike Methods UN-published and not recognized. :)

    Mike
     
  2. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    I used duct tape for my pad seams as well. Pad tape would make crinkly noise and didn't stick as well as duct tape.
     
  3. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In I Support TFP Senior Member

    Hi Chris, yah, snap, krakle and pop should stay in your cereal bowl.

    I also use duck tape for the perimeter, unless the job or area warrants glue, in my case, it's apartment work over concrete or gypcrete, but !! even if wood, I would still mostly tape because of the constant replacements. I've pulled my quota of staples 10 fold already and continue to run into crazy in-experienced pad installers who go absolutely crazy with the hammer gun. :mad: ( I use to be one of them, still crazy, but not w/ the staples. :p )

    Mike
     
  4. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Maybe you haven't heard or seen what duct tape under carpet does after 5 or 10 years. My first boss used to use duct tape and I got to remove his work many years later and hear what customers used to say about it.

    I discovered there was a big difference in the quality of pad tape between brands. My favorite supply house stopped carrying the 3M brand once and I went to their competition for it. The crappy stuff did make noise - even before the job was done. The good stuff didn't and it was way stickier.

    Don't remember where I learned it, but pad tape wasn't used in continuous lengths either. Short 2 or 3-foot lengths, not overlapped, was how I installed it.

    I did use duct tape around the perimeter on those rare occasions when a customer bought a pad that was too thick, or didn't want to change their existing pad and it was cut too far away from the tackless in some spots. Duct tape helped prevent the settling of the carpet into that gully between tackless and pad edge - yes, power stretching bridges that gap, but carpet will settle over time. The tape also helped compress the pad at the edge of the tack strip so you could get the carpet to hold better on the pins.

    One more good use for duct tape: on top of tackless, it helped when the carpet was too thin for the length of the tackless pins. None of the suppliers in my area carried tackless with different length pins. It was all the same length. So, a layer or three of duct tape kept my customers from bleeding on their carpet.
     
  5. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Well now I'm curious. What does duct tape do under carpet? It sure as heck is more expensive than pad tape. Other than that I've never heard of a down side but that doesn't mean that there ain't one.
     
  6. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    What I noticed was, when it was installed in long, continuous strips, it got dried up, wrinkled and crunchy sounding. When used on foam pad, it somehow preserved the pad and, when the pad flattened everywhere else, it didn't under the tape, so you could see the seams under the carpet.

    I also used duct tape on the nose of steps to prevent them from wearing out as fast. I think I started doing that when I saw what the tape did under carpet on the pad seams. When used on padded stair noses, it didn't seem to become crunchy like it did across a room.
     
  7. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Interesting. I wonder if there is a pad rep on here or maybe CFR has some insight on this. With all the moisture barrier pads out there these days I would think that this is even more important now than ever. I never did like pad tape but I would use it over duct tape if it meant a better job in the long run for the customer.

    I don't know of anybody that buys tack strip with D pins for short nap carpet. We always hammered the pins down in the areas people were most likely to step on them. This was a big problem for the installers when I was working for a shop that sold a lot of cheap carpet.
     
  8. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    My supply house never carried shorter pinned tackless either. It was "C" strip unless you wanted to buy a pallet of it.
    I have used the selvedge edge, binding, even some very cheap vinyl to shorten pin hieght. Overlapped the vinyl unto the pad, you would never know it was there.
    Duct tape don't let the pad breath so it don't wear out.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  9. Don Monfils

    Don Monfils PRO CARPET Charter Member

    I have installed carpet for 29 years now .
    I have used duct tape on pad seams for probably 25 years now .
    I had heard about issues with rubber pad , using duct tape at the seams .
    I have never seen any issues with any job I have done or that I have ripped up ,with duct taped pad seams.
     
  10. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    There's thin duct tape which I would use for pad, why spend more? The masking tape like Jim said use to be good, then the other brand came in cheap, didn't stick well. I've seen the masking tape disintegrated rarely, mostly had to cut tape at joints to remove.

    Proper way for slab was to glue joints, perimeter and to tape. We did that on every job. I think the cri 105 said to use vinyl coated tape.

    I've seen no issues with duct taped seams but rarely use to see it used, made me chuckle whenever I did see another installer use it during ripup. Mostly everyone would shortcut the steps, sporadic tackstrip tape, but they were not power stretchers where stretching the carpet would cause the pad to overlap the strip. Same thing with joints, the pad tape was not always strong enough alone to hold the pad seams together.
     
  11. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    For the last 20 years or so I tape the seams and glue the perimeter. Spread the glue with a piece of card board or scrap pad. Have even used multipurpose and spread it very thin. Cheaper than pad glue. Worked for me.
    Had on installer tell me he just tipped the bucket upside down and run with it. He didn't say how he got the bucket tipped back over. but I can imagine a big gob of glue to pick up.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  12. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    I never mentioned using masking tape because I never used masking tape for anything. I used painters tape for masking off glue lines and for what it was actually intended to be used for, painting, but never for pad and never actual masking tape. :hu:
     
  13. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I used masking tape for a while, then it wouldn't come off the roll without tearing so I quit that.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  14. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Almond colored tape, not sure what exact materials it is made of, could have been exact same thing, I don't recall any difference, maybe just the term everyone used because that was its use.

    Tape does get annoying if it gets nicked up in the truck.

    Is blue tape same as "masking tape" similar ingredients yet color coded for identification and different adhesive. Adhesive on a roll. I never saw any specs that determined a certain tape was designed just for pad, it was only the minimum standards to qualify if you could unroll it and apply. It was cheap too, then went up in price and you can not find cheap take even at Lowes. Can't remember what a 5 pack was. 2" wide
    Shur tape was the brand we used.
     
  15. JPfloor

    JPfloor Pro Member

    This works great in large areas, very fast, easy, and economical. Use the cheapest multi you can find. The trick is not to start with a full bucket.... In smaller areas use a coffee can.
     
  16. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Best pad adhesive ever made period! ( period denotes indisputable facts)
     

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  17. JPfloor

    JPfloor Pro Member

    Do they still make that stuff? I thought that went the way of many good adhesives that actually stick...:cool:
     
  18. kylenelson

    kylenelson You'll find me on the floor I Support TFP Senior Member

    We still use it. Smells good too
     
  19. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    All the adhesives could be coming back if there's no EPA, we are now the number 3 manufacturing country (1-Russia,2-China)in "make believe"

    Yeah, you have to smear that stuff flat for it to stick, I've done some memory foam but I can't remember I don't think it dried quick.
     
  20. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In I Support TFP Senior Member

    MPA That's my second choice method and like Daris said the key is
    spreading it thin, not with a notched trowel :mad:

    By the way, ipg " Fix It " duck tape, made in US seems to have the
    best grip on Mohawks bonded urethane.
     

    Attached Files:

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