Bottom of door hitting new t-molding. Easy fix?

Discussion in 'Flooring Potpourri' started by Greg Jones, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    I just had new engineered hardwood floors installed, but the installers said they don't cut doors, and one door is hitting a t-molding. I'd like to shave the bottom of the door so it doesn't hit the t-molding, and I prefer not to take the door off the hinges. Plus, I don't own any kind of power saw. Is it possible to sand/shave it while it's still hanging on the hinges and without using power tools? There's about 1/8th of an inch gap under the door when it's not hitting the t-molding. I was thinking of putting a towel down on the floor (to protect the floor), laying a thin piece of wood on it, and then placing sandpaper on top of the wood so that the door will barely be able to pass over the sandpaper, and it will sand it a bit by moving the door back and forth. But I was wondering if there was some kind of sanding tool that could make this easier. I was imagining a rubber belt that has sandpaper on one said and smooth on the other and putting that under the door and pulling it along the bottom of the door or something like that.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Tom Potter

    Tom Potter I Support TFP

    You'll be there all day doing that.
    Its actually (usually) very easy to pop a door off & give it a trim. No friends or neighbors can give you a hand/lend you a saw?

    I cut doors on my jobs. It's an easy up charge. I pop the hinge, mark what I want to take off. Score my line with a utility knife a couple times (very important for a hollow core door!) Blue tape where my saw will ride (prevents scratches) & cut with blade on the side of the line closest to the bottom of the door.
     
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  3. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Now that’s just crazy to me. I get that not everybody cuts doors but they should have at least taken the door off for the installation. If it needed to be cut then leave it off. If it’s an exterior door then you need to come up with plan B cus you don’t mess with exterior doors.

    Shoot, I had a sweet job a month ago and I cut six doors for the guy for free just because I didn’t want any loose ends when I left. That stuff drives me nuts.
     
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  4. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Tom, you need to make one of these. I used one before I got my track saw. Makes cutting doors a breeze.

     
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  5. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    It's highly unorthodox to not just take the door off but so be it, let us work from that assumption. Get a belt sander belt, cut it so it's good and long and just "saw" it back and forth under the door until it fits??
     
  6. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti Senior Member

    A Crain 812 jamb saw could do it but you really need to have experience doing it. An oscillating tool for the final edhe if it’s a pocket door.

    Ideally airflow for circulating air conditioning there should be @ 1/2” gap.
     
  7. Tom Potter

    Tom Potter I Support TFP

    I have made many of those over the years. I make them out of scrap underlayment & some glue.
    Problem was they always got tossed in the trash because they look like scrap next to a pile of scraps. Could never hang on to one.
    They are great though. Clamp, score & cut.
     
  8. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    How about the idea of using a half round rasp file or some other type of metal file to file the bottom of the door? Any suggestions on a particular tool?
     
  9. Dan Schultz

    Dan Schultz Certified Wood Floor Inspector Charter Member

    Sorry Mr. Jones, this door needs to be taken off the hinges to prevent damage. I'm sure you don't want to replace the door or the new flooring you just had installed.

    Did you purchase the flooring installed, or did you hire the installer yourself?
     
  10. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    I purchased the flooring from a local flooring store, and they hired the installer. So everything is being done through the store.
     
  11. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I guess I don't understand the reluctance of taking off the door. Very simple to do and then do as everyone suggested of taping scribing and cutting. Mess would be outdoors. Make sure to put a piece of tape on the door with arrow point to bottom. another way of telling bottom is the door latch is usually closer to the bottom. I did see a carpenter of 30 years experience cut the top.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  12. Dan Schultz

    Dan Schultz Certified Wood Floor Inspector Charter Member

    The store needs to correct the issue. On their dime. Yesterday.
     
  13. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    The reluctance is I am not handy at all, and I have a very low confidence level and high mess up rate when trying to do handyman type of work. I've never used any power tool except for a drill. So I'm just afraid of screwing it up, or worse, cutting off a finger.
     
  14. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    The store claims that cutting doors is outside their scope of work. I talked to the 2 installers myself, who I really like and seem to be great at installing floors, and they said they don't cut doors, and I need to get a handyman to do it.
     
  15. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    That's floorlayer speak for "ah ha ha ha get stuffed"

    OK, so if it is like 99% of doors all you need to do is get something thin and strong, maybe a nail hanging around and place it at the bottom of the hinge in that little hole. Nails wouldn't be the go to tool for this but I presume you don't have a lot of gear, then tap it with a hammer. The door hinge pin will start to pop out of the top of the hinge at which point you can keep wailing on that nail or use a flat head screwdriver underneath the head of the door pin to remove it the rest of the way. Do that 3 times and the door is off my good friend. Close the door to the best of your ability while doing this.
    Barring tools a chunk of wood and some sandpaper (60 grit or so) attached to it and you can sand the door down. Not ideal but power tool free and no fear of missing digits
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
  16. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    Then find a carpenter or handyman/woman in your area and pay them to do the job. One door is going to be a minimum charge kinda job, but it will be worth it. You could have had the job done and be enjoying your new floor by now. What's the real problem here? :hu:
     
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  17. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    Well, I'm reluctant to pay a $100 minimum for someone to come and cut one door, especially because other rooms are being done, so additional doors are going to need to be cut. So I definitely don't want to pay a handyman $100 each time to come four times and I'd rather have him come on one day and cut all of them, if I have to use a handyman. That's part of the reason why I was hoping to just be able to do this myself by putting a sanding belt or metal file under the door (while protecting the floor) and move the door or the file/belt back and forth. It would save me hundreds of dollars to do it myself that way.
     
  18. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Maybe you have a neighbor that would do it for you, but doing it yourself would be a big confidence builder. Diters will accept less than perfect when done by them, Hell even pro's mess up. I told my customers I make at least one mistake on every job. Only difference I know how to hid it most times, if not I replace what I screwed up-once in 53 years that I remember.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  19. Jim McClain

    Jim McClain Owner/Founder Administrator

    What's to stop you from getting all the doors done at once now instead of after you do each floor? If you know what material is going down, then get the doors cut now and stop worrying about it. You admitted you are not good at DIY. If you want to have new floors, then you have to protect them and your investment. Sometimes that means an extra charge for something. The average door cutting is less than an hour's work. Four doors is still close to only an hour's work, so a half-decent carpenter can get the job done quickly and you never have to think about it again. All these other make-do methods is just BS hack work.
     
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  20. Greg Jones

    Greg Jones Member

    I was actually thinking about getting them all cut now, but I was also thinking that it might be better to have the floors and t-moldings installed first, because the handyman is less likely to mess it up if they can see it with their own eyes instead of estimating/calculating.
     
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