Backing delamination after flooding

Discussion in 'Carpet Q&A' started by Crucial, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    Concrete basement floor - long pile carpet with a pad. We had a toilet that kept running and flooded the carpet in the next room. We vacuumed the water, pulled up the carpet and removed the wet pad. We ran fans and a dehumidifier for a few days until everything was dry. The carpet looks fine on top but the diamond paterned plastic backing is delaminated in some parts. One section in particular is about 2' x 1'. I'm trying to find out if this type of damage is repairable using some latex adhesive or ??

    Any help or advice you can give will be appreciated.
     
  2. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    The short answer is no. The longer, possibly HAIL MARY approach if it is only a wee section as you say would be to remove it, flat trowel some carpet latex in there and let it dry. Essentially you would be trying to recreate the adhesion that exists between the primary and secondary backings, this of course if what was destroyed with the flood in the first place.

    I cannot say it is my first choice of things to do, however i would be lying to you if i said i haven't done it. The stretch comes from that secondary backing so without it all you have is a wet noodle. No pun intended there.
     
  3. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I've done what Mark said about working carpet glue into the backing many times over the years. In fact if carpet is delaminated for 3 inches from the mill along the edge the installer is responsible for repairing it.
    You should be good to go.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  4. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Normally I would use latex seaming adhesive, but that would probably work. Just let it dry good before putting it back on the floor or it will be stuck to the floor. Are you replacing the pad?

    :old:

    Daris
     
  5. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    Yes the pad will be replaced.
     
  6. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    If you are replacing the pad I'd find a way to get rid of the stickiness of the adhesive, dust it with talc or whatever otherwise when you step in that spot it may stick then let loose causing a popping sound. Even put a piece of an old bed sheet on the spot, or glue it all down. Many options.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  7. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    I appreciate the replies. If I can fix it it'll save me $1200 in new carpet installation. I just have to try and find someone willing to attempt the restretch when I'm done. I understand a pro's hesitation to not want to do the job if it has the potential to let loose later. I don't expect any guarantee from them.
     
  8. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    Getting most installers to do a restretch isn't so bad, at least if they are decent. There is never a guaratee of success and the fact you are are upfront about it makes it easy on a guy!!

    ...we need more people like you :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Kind of a very small area(2x1) is like to see a picture of backing, there’s many qualities but I’d use seaming latex as Daris stated, in general that’s what trained installers would use.

    Making an Area Rug what would you use Daris? Bonding secondary backing.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    I use regular multi-purpose if a large rug. If not spray glue.

    :old:

    Daris
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    A few pics
    IMG_0104.JPG IMG_0106.JPG IMG_0107.JPG
     
  12. Daris Mulkin

    Daris Mulkin The One and Only Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Why not just turn it into your homeowners insurance and get new?
    From what I understand most homeowners covers things like that.

    :old:

    Daris
     
  13. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    We are thinking about that too. $1000 deductible makes it hardly seem worth it.
     
  14. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    I’d say repair it. For the two small areas I would probably hotmelt repair and an adhesive for the bigger area. I’ve done a small latex area but didn’t try to pull it apart afterward.
     
  15. Mark Brown

    Mark Brown On The Surface Flooring I Support TFP

    That one run is on your seam!!
    Sad face. Latex the backing and get that seam put back together and you will be right as rain....which I hope didn't cause that mess in the first place :)
     
  16. Florida Floor guy

    Florida Floor guy Pro Member

    I did not know installer was responsible for delam On the edge. I always called the store and they would have it replaced. How long would you let it dry before it is stretched?
     
  17. Mike Antonetti

    Mike Antonetti I Support TFP Senior Member

    Crock of crap if you ask me, I’ve heard the same bs where they want you to fill the trenches in the seam area with latex.
     
  18. Crucial

    Crucial Member

    I ordered the seam sealer and will see what happens on a few test pieces. I found the surebonder hot glue guns for $100 with the t-nozzle for another $20-$40. I may end up giving that a shot if the latex doesn't pan out.
     
  19. Mike Sliwinski

    Mike Sliwinski The Doctor Is In Senior Member

    Try this DIY method with the tools you probably already have, because it's such a small area. I would use your craft making hot glue gun, smearing dots of glue every 1 or 2 '' in the open area and every 1/2'' along the seam edge. Then put the seam together utilizing the existing seam tape and the same hot glue gun. I like using an old fashion steel iron to compress the adhesive into the backing or tape.

    Have fun
    Mike
     
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