125 year old hardwood

Discussion in 'Hardwood and Laminates Q&A' started by Joshua Paluzi, Jan 12, 2019 at 12:08 AM.

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  1. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    I recently bought a house from the 1800's and pulled the carpet. Great hardwood someone finished it in something that looks like perma plaque. I don't want to refinish, I love the character but I do wanna make it look better. Lot's of dull spots and peeling finish. What can I do?
     
  2. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Screen and recoat is what one would normally do if your finish was still intact. You would be abrading the existing layer of finish (not actually sanding any wood, just scuffing the existing layer of finish) so that a new coat will properly bond.

    You mentioned that you have some peeling finish. You may, or may not, be able to get away with just screening the floor depending on the extent of peeling and damage/ wear to the wood itself.

    Pictures of what’s going on will help us to better help you.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    Thanks so much for the reply. I will take some and post when I get home today
     
  4. kwfloors

    kwfloors Fuzz on the brain Charter Member I Support TFP Senior Member

    Someone in the past maybe put varathane on it.
     
  5. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    Below are pics as requested... Thanks for all the help

    20190112_153203.jpg 20190112_153224.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 12, 2019 at 2:45 PM
  6. Tom Potter

    Tom Potter I Support TFP

    Yeah, that's definitely not a screen & re coat.
    That's a full on sand & refinish. And dont expect perfection. There will be some stains & color fluctuations.

    But that's what makes hardwood floors unique.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Looks like someone applied some type of store bought miracle finish. Wax based? Have you tried to remove it?
     
  8. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    It peel up fairly easily or you can get under a sheet with a putty knife and are very careful. I did about 6sq in 15 min with a putty knife and a plastic scraper
     
  9. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    So all that needs to come up. If not, it will gum up your screens. Once that’s done, you are back down to your original floor. A screen and recoat will give you a new consistent looking layer of finish but it won’t remove any discoloration or fix any gouges, scratches or other damage. I’m guessing you already knew that though. Personally I love that look. If you want something other than that, I highly recommend hiring a pro.
     
  10. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    I wanna keep the character, so all of that will stay
     
  11. Chris 45

    Chris 45 Director of P.R. on some deserted island. I Support TFP

    Good deal then. Is this something you are going to try and tackle yourself or are you just looking for options and opinions?
     
  12. Joshua Paluzi

    Joshua Paluzi Member

    Will take a lot longer to work on it in my spare time. But I'll appreciate it more. I don't want it to be perfect anyway I like the way it looks now. Just want to be a little more protected
     
  13. Smitty Wilson

    Smitty Wilson Member

    Keep peeling all that crap off...get a nice scraper blade...all that character mark will still show. A floor that old would be finished in a spirit varnish or shellac...

    So ideally you should re-finish with natural shellac not the Zinser crap in a can.

    Buy shellac flakes or buttons and re-finish with that...if you want that rustic old look why not just re-finish it with the same materials of a 100 years ago?
     
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